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Thread: Copy cats

  1. #9
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (JustLikeAPill @ Aug. 20 2005,9:26)]hey... interesting thought... if you pollinate a single flower with 50% pollen from one species, 50% from another, will some plants be hybrids and some be pure?
    Not sure what you mean between hybrid and pure. The pollen won't mix so you won't get a seed with all 3. You will end up with a mix with some seed a cross between A and B and the other a cross between A and C. A being the female plant, and B and C the two pollen types. You won't necessarily get 50/50 on the AB/AC ratio either, even if you could get precisely half one pollen and half the other.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    Tony-

    I tend to agree with you. As far as I have always known neither spectabilis or eymae produce a broad flattened peristome, at least they don't on any of my clones and I grow several of EP's breeding specimens as well as the hybrids made from them. None of my emae x spectabilis remotely resemble this one. That specimen is screaming veitchii. Just because they pulled it from the same seed flat as the other eymae x spectabilis does not mean that a pollen grain or two from veitchii did not some how get transfered to the eymae female flower. Also...not all eymae x veitchii will have the same peristome coloration or degree of striping. When you are dealing with hydrids, especially from seed, you get a number of different results. I just don't see where two species with rolled striped peristomes can produce an offspring with a broad flattened peristome.

    Just my $.02

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    I tend to agree as well (for what it's worth). One needs to be maniacally stringent when hybridising, to keep the female scape untouched as well as the male. All it takes is for one insect, or even strong air flow, to move pollen from a male to a female, or from one male to another. Also, if one female scape had several different male plants used to pollinate it, there's always a risk of transfer. Covering flower heads from the moment they appear is the only way to make sure contamination doesn't occur.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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