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Thread: Nepenthes seeds in the wild from sarawak

  1. #1

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    Identifying seeds collected in the wild where nepenthes vines intertwine and cross over each other and other creepers collecting seeds may pose a problem .That mean pulling the vine to lead the way to the root source.The vines are brittle and may break(this happen at time to me not collecting seeds but inorder to explore the ground pitchers).Further more the dense foliage make it impossible to move freely,cuts,mosie bites and intense tropical heat.

    Any tell tale sign to show this is mirabilis seed,that is ampullaria seeds,or vise versa.

    Posted here are photos of what seeds? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] tq

    ......................................
    ...the forest...my garden...
    ........................................

    which is male/female seeds?

  2. #2

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    There are some differences between species in relation to shape/size/colour of flowers and seed pods. However, some species are quite similar. In your example, if you were certain of the two or three species that were in the clump, you might be able to identify the species from the seed heads. From that seed, at least you'd know the female parentage. The chances of numerous males from several species having pollinated the seed head is very head in the circumstance, so a fair percentage of the seed would be hybrid seed.

    From the looks of the top picture, I'd say it was an ampullaria seed head. But I could be completely wrong.

    Male and female flowers are easy to tell apart. Female flowers have a little seed pod as part of the flower, and male flowers have a pollen head. There are some good pictures floating round the net (see Robert Ziemer's brilliant site: http://www.humboldt.edu/~rrz7001/Nepenthes.html). Unfortunately, there's no way of knowing the sex of seed itself, or any Nepenthes plant, until it flowers...
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  3. #3

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    I'll go along with Hamish on the top photo. That vine looks nearly identical to one of our N. hookeriana, but it is most likely ampullaria IMHO. The second photo looks like mirabilis to me, but [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img].

  4. #4

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    Hamish and Trent i think i can depend on both your years of experience.It is not a wild guess:: .The first is ampullaria and the second is mirabilis.
    Another question in the first photo .The top two are female seeds? Bottom one(first photo) is male seeds?Am i right( search in the internet:laugh: ). All nepenthes disperse seed first through explosion and disperse s by winds,right,no?[img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]

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    Hi Robert,
    The female seedpods are banana shaped. They split open and the fine fiber-like seed is dispersed by the wind. N. northiana has a differently shaped seed, and is heavier, and appears to rely more on water dispersal.

  6. #6

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    that definitely is something new,tq::

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