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Thread: N. x burbidgeae x edwardsiana

  1. #9
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    As with many of MT plants, their cultures were started with seed from the wild. They maintain that their plants can have upwards of a dozen different clones in the mix. It is not surprising to see variation with the species they offer.

    As for the hybrid in question. I had wondered the same when they first came on the market. Here is some information I received in response to my inquiry as to it's origin and number of clones.

    "Referring to your questions below, seed was collected from one N. burbidgeae and the seedlings are now big enough to determine that it is a hybrid N. burbidgeae x edwardsiana. It grows in the same habitat as N. edwardsiana. It is definitely not a N. edwardsiana or a N. macrophylla. It is a single clone."

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  2. #10

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    So was only ONE seed propagated for tc? And all the offspring grown up to observe this difference?

    I am still to believe that there are more than one seed started tc clone. I will see if all these hidden pitchering is the cross or something else.


    M

    thanks Tony for checking. But do they (MT) know anything any way? It seems like there are too many arm extensions to really see if any one individual knows what is going on. Also their many new employees and staffing creates doubt that there is anyone who really knows.

    M
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

  3. #11

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    Add to that the fact that they're no longer maintaining their Nepenthes arm, and are concentrating on palms, gingers and aroids, it's very difficult to get any meaningful information from them on Neps.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  4. #12
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Unfortunately your correct. The folks that had the knowledge are no longer there. The email I quoted from was May 2003 however. I will see about getting some input from folks that would have more knowledge about this particular plant. The way I understood it, some seed from N. burbidgeae was cultured and a single culture turned out as a natural hybrid.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  5. #13

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    Hi Tony,

    Yes, that's right. From a large batch of seed collected from N. burbidgeae, only a single tissue cultured seedling turned out to be this hybrid. It was initially sown in 1997, but was slow to propagate at first and then sold as N. burbidgeae (along with other true seedlings) until larger plants developed and it was revealed to be a hybrid. It's probable parentage was determined by the obvious characteristics of N. edwardsiana and the fact that the two species were growing in near proximity in the wild.

    It is interesting to see that growers have noticed so much variation within a single clone. Whilst somatic mutation during tissue culture division is not impossible, I think it is far more likely that there are many environmental factors that contribute to the appearance of a pitcher as it develops.

    Best regards,
    Ch'ien

  6. #14
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Hi Ch'ien,

    Nice to hear from you. Much appreciated taking the time to stop in and clarify/verify the background on this fantastic plant! It never ceases to amaze me how much plant age, and environmental and cultural factors can alter the morphology on a single clone.

    Thanks!
    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  7. #15
    fly-catchers's Avatar
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    Here are a couple of shots of two of my very young plants:



    This is the one that survived for 6 months and them died last Oct [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]
    Although perhaps difficult to see it did display a really quite pronounced clawed peristrome for such a young plant. It also remained quite yellow despite good direct light.



    This is my other plant which I have now had about 18 months now. Although it has produced slightly larger pitchers, none have so far displayed anything like the same clawing on the peristrome. Its ridged but still fairly flat. It has coloured up more as well. Both have been grown in identical conditions, light levels etc.
    Its a slow grower but I will be interested to how it develops as it gets bigger.

    cheers

    bill

  8. #16

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    Bill,

    Referring to your second photo, this could quite likely be a pure N. burbidgeae that accidentally got mixed in with the hybrid when they were sold. You should be able to verify this when the plant gets larger.

    Best regards,
    Ch'ien

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