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Thread: Flowering times

  1. #9

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    Hi,
    I cant say much about flowering times as in which month or periods, because dont have many flowering plants...but I know my neps sent up numerous inflorescence during the rainy season, when the weather changed dramatically from hot and sunny to cold and wet... ( I'm tropical, by the way)

  2. #10

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    That makes sense, given that in the tropics seasons are meaningless, and 'wet' and 'dry' have more significance. I wish drenching my plants would have that effect, but I suspect there are other factors involved during the rainy season that come into play, like air pressure etc.
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  3. #11

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    For alata highland it seems to flower in April in habitat. That's one month before rainy season sets in. Maybe it also extends over a longer duration, - I visited a very few locations in April and found only flowers, but no seeds.
    Volker
    http://pitcher-plants.com/bannersmall.jpg Manila, Philippines, Elev: 80 m, 24-33 C

    Tropical outdoor growers: Please visit our Carnivorous Plants in the tropics forum

  4. #12

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    Volker, I remember seeing an article about N. mirabilis from Hong Kong, that it flowered in the dry season, with seed having a couple of months before the rainy season. Studies were done of seed viability, and the highest germination rates occurred with seed that had been left for 28 days from harvest. Seed planted earlier and later has a lower germination rate, so this was the evolutionary 'sweet spot'. This is important in a monsoonal climate like Hong Kong. In the pure tropics where rainfall is more regular, you find species like gracilis and bicalcarata where the seed must be sown within days after harvest or it won't germinate, the window of viability is that short.

    I'm going to keep a diary this year of what species flower when, to see whether next season it repeats the pattern. The other issue is that some species will have a second 'flush' of flowers.

    Hamish
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

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