User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 16

Thread: Hybrids vs. species

  1. #1
    srduggins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    so. cal.
    Posts
    668
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I first started collecting I would take any plant I could get. I still own 4 of Gubler's hybrids from Home Depot. Shortly thereafter I only wanted species. Today, with more reasonable prices, hybrid vigor and interesting crosses available, I am developing more interest in hybrids. Plus I already own most of the inexpensive highland species. Two of my most interesting plants are hybrids. Probably because the interesting species I own are still small. But I still want to get a real macfarlanei as mine is looking like a hybrid with sanguinea.

    Is this a normal progression in collecting? What do you people think?
    A day without Nepenthes is like a day without sunshine

    --steve

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For those of us who actually survive the learning curve of Home Depot, Lowes, etc.... and then survive a discussion forum and the multitude of approaches that appear to be so confusing, and survive our first shipments of beginner plants from the forum members - I would say so.

    Some of us like to have "one of everything" (Me). Some want to specialize in a certain type, like petiolaris complex (RL.....) Other want to have a enough variety, so to have plants that look different enough from one another (Elgecko). Some just fall in love with a certain genuses, like Sarracenias or Utrics or Nepenthes, etc...

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Is this a normal progression in collecting? What do you people think?

    Yes. You are realizing that Nepenthes growing is not completing a checklist, but fullfilling your personal aesthetic sensibilities.

  4. #4
    endparenthesis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    1,262
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Collect what you want. There's no standard to fall inside or outside of.

  5. #5
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know about normal progression.. but most that have started out with the mindset, species only. Eventually see that there are a large number of hybrids that compliment each other and result in something beyond what is found among the species... Of course there are also plenty of hybrids that result in a plant without much character at all.

    While fun to say ok I am going to stick to this group and this group only. I think in the end it boils down to 'hey that's really attractive to me so I am going to grow it!'

    Unfortunately I don't have unlimited space or ideal lowland conditions so I have to chose my stock accordingly but overall there have only been a few instances where I have brought in a bunch of plants and not kept at least one! That includes hybrids I have carried [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There was a time when I wouldnt have touched a hybrid with a barge pole. That was until I saw some of Geoffs hybrids and then I got the bug. I am still slightly uncomfortable about non-natural hybrids, but when you see something like lowii x ventricosa its hard not to be impressed.
    Personally I only grow one plant of each type of hybrid that I fancy (unlike species) and I do have a preference for anything with lowii in them. I also only like to take on plants with a good pedigree, B&Q type plants are anathema for me ..but then I suppose that the purist in me.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    703
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I started off with hybrids because I believed all the bumpf about them being so much easier to grow than species. When my species collection increased and I found many of them no more difficult (and in some instances easier), I focussed on them. If I had unlimited space, I would have a good mix of both of them. But I have very limited space, and I have a strong conservation ethos. Accordingly, I am almost a pure species person, with the odd outstanding hybrid (and in my view there aren't that many of them). I keep at least 3 of each species to give me breeding stock, plus I try to get representatives from as many locations and varieties as I can. I have aristolochioides from 2 locations, jacquelineae from 3 etc. Given the amount of habitat destruction in their native habitat, I tend to look at hybrids as being a bit like the cockroaches of the Nepenthes world.

    If I won lotto and could build acres of greenhouse space, I would abe a bit more forgiving [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Demystifying Nepenthes: http://www.nepenthesforeveryone.com

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, Planet Earth
    Posts
    338
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did start out with a lot of species. But after growing many, I had found out that there are different clones (most are tc) that perform better than others. When you can purchase seed grown material, I believe this is the best money can buy. I would opt for hybrids because many are seed originated over species that are true and tc. Every collection should have a little of both. Species fills the gap for authentic material while the vigor and appeal of the hybrids should not be over-looked. Remember, the Victorian Hybrids are still with us today, the original species which made these are not! Today's hybrids tend to be more daring and planned. A mere hundred years from now will determine whether hybrids like Medusa and Predator will still be here with us, or will anyone want a true N. mira? Will the value of N. Trusmadiensis still be high, or like the flat screened laptop computer, be massed produced and sold at K-Mart?
    Hybrids will be around much longer than the species that they originated from (following history) and in the wild (if there is a wild) these will be rare or extinct!

    Michael
    Morticia:\"Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc, 'We would gladly feast on those who try to subdue us.' Not just pretty words. but words to live by!\"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •