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Thread: Poor growth

  1. #9

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    Good lord rainforestguy! You have a freakin' nursery of Nepenthes there! How many plants do you grow?

    Great looking setup by the way [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/cool.gif[/img]

  2. #10

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    a fair few neps there [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] They all seem to be liking some sun there.
    Bye for now Julian

  3. #11
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Lam_wn @ Sep. 06 2005,1:40)]Root problem? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]
    That was the last thing I wanted...disturbing the roots again!
    If your careful there shouldn't be any negative effects. And if there is a problem with the roots in the current mix then changing it could make a big difference. Everyones conditions are and cultural practices are different. The most important aspect is adjusting a mix that works best for you.

    Ok, maybe I should confirm first, the red stuff on the leaf...they are fungus and not burns? I always thought they were caused by plant adjusting to light levels!
    And to treat this, the only way is fungicide? Must this be diluted more than usual too?[/quote]

    The red spotting/splotchy look is not burns or light adjustment.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Lam_wn @ Sep. 06 2005,1:40)]
    How about potting mix, let me get this straight, is cocopeat, even 100% cocopeat, airy enough a mix for most plants? Or is it advisable to use LFS with perlite only.
    I dont want to get this wrong again, so just bear with me, is a mix of cocopeat, peat, perlite, charcoal, LFS ratio of 2:1:1:1:1 suitable?

    besides these, I dont have much else, but I just read up about "cocopeat hogs" (not sure what that is supposed to mean)
    Potting mix should be WELL drained and airy, but yet hold sufficient water. The problem is the potting mix needs to balance with all the other cultural practices. How often you water, how much you water, air movement, temperature etc etc etc. The mix should hold moisture for at least a few days but yet it shouldn't be waterlogged after watering. Personally I would skip the peat and maybe even the coco peat. I would go with a LFS/perlite/charcoal mix at 1:1:1 with maybe a handful of the coco peat. The thing is you need to try different blends out and see how they do. THEN you need to make adjustments based on how it performs and the plants grow in your care. It takes time and a fair bit of experimenting and observing and tinkering to come up with a mix that will do well as a general mix. After that then you will learn how to adjust for some plants that like a bit more moisture or better draining mix or larger plants in big 2+gallon pots etc...

    There appears to be a fair bit of moss and moisture holding material on the surface of your mix which leads me to believe it is holding too much moisture for your current cultural conditions. So you can either make adjustments to the mix, make adjustments to how much and often you water OR make adjustments to both.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Lam_wn @ Sep. 06 2005,1:40)]
    I have not yet checked the roots, but I want to be sure of a perfect potting mix before I transplant, because I feel there has been too much root disturbance already, 2 transplatns with 3 month interval is quite bad right?

    Thanks
    New plants should start to settle in and begin to show healthy new growth within a couple weeks. If they are not doing that then something is wrong and changes need to be made. Better to make changes than keep them in their current situation which is obviously not working and won't suddenly do so by waiting longer.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  4. #12

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    Tony's suggestion for a mix is pretty much fool proof.
    What exactly is "high peat content soil?" Something other than garden style peat moss? Sounds kind of suspicious.
    Also, where is the cocopeat coming from? If it's not Sri Lankan, than it may have a high amount of salts in it.
    It's not a bad idea to soak and change the water a few times on all your ingredients.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  5. #13
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    What a complex mix! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] Keep it simple like me. LFS and perlite. Vary the proportion for lowlands and intermediates.

    I use Horti Orchid Hormone NPK 30:15:20 as fertiliser. 0.5ml per 4L of water. Here's a tip, buy Vit B tablets from Guardian Pharmancy. It's off the rack. Crush one into powder and dissolve in a litre of water. Use that to tide them over the shock of transplanting.

    See Vit B1 helped neps recover!
    Cindy

  6. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Cindy @ Sep. 08 2005,12:29)]What a complex mix! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] Keep it simple like me. LFS and perlite. Vary the proportion for lowlands and intermediates.

    I use Horti Orchid Hormone NPK 30:15:20 as fertiliser. 0.5ml per 4L of water. Here's a tip, buy Vit B tablets from Guardian Pharmancy. It's off the rack. Crush one into powder and dissolve in a litre of water. Use that to tide them over the shock of transplanting.

    See Vit B1 helped neps recover!
    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img] Great minds think a like! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_o_32.gif[/img]
    just joking, but I thought of using Vitamin B1 too, since I dont think superthrive is selling here, but was slightly hesitant...overdose of vitamins will not be harmful right? unlike fertilizers
    I am slightly afriad of using too much LFS in my mix since the type I use (I think not very high quality) decomposes rather quickly over time. But I dont have much experience with cocopeat either and am afraid it will decompose even quicker! I was told to use a much coarser mix - with orchid bark... but not sure what it is, and dont know if I can get it here...

    Thanks

  7. #15
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    i use a capful of superthrive per 24 oz. no overdoses yet [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

  8. #16

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    Have had bad experiences with coco peat. In a hot humid climate it breaks down in the lower parts of the pot into a reddish sludge. The husks or chips are much better. Vermiculite is too dense also.
    There's some controversy about perlite/sponge rock. It may leach flourides into the medium over time, but we have used it judiciously with very good results. Sponge rock is perlite-only bigger. Because you're in Singapore and have such high humidity, you can use an open mix, which really stimulates a large healthy root system. When you water, flush the pot. the water should come flooding out the bottom within seconds. Also, overpot. The evaporation from the medium is helpful to the plant and contributes to a good microclimate. We noticed that overpotting was extremely beneficial for raff gigantea (BE 99). Merrilliana has a long root system. They need the space and good drainage.
    As for Superthrive- no comment. (Did someone else say that?)
    Personally, I would stay away from fertilizer until the plants are re-established. Once they get going again, do fertilize. I suspect there may be micronutrient problems with merrilliana, but that's another topic!

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