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Thread: Nepenthes change sex from tissue culture?

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    Hey Folks,

    I was wondering if Nepenthes can change sex as they get older from known tissue culture specimens. Meaning there's been discussion that almost all N. aristolochioides are male, and almost all hamatas seem to be male, or other hybrids / species females. But is it possible that known "males" for example from TC can turn to females because of environmental conditions when they're in their juvenile stages? I know some fishes are able to become male or female depending on the environmental stresses that may dictate a need for more of one sex. I would assume that TC plants are exact clones of the plant they are cultured from. So if that plant's sex is known, it should turn out to be the same, right? Just wondering.

    Joel
    Nepenthes Around the House
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 12-12-2010 at 01:24 PM. Reason: Nomenclature adjustment

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    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (NepsAroundTheHouse @ Sep. 17 2005,5:48)]I know some fishes are able to become male or female depending on the environmental stresses that may dictate a need for more of one sex.
    well joel i think its not due to envir. changes that determines a sex of a fish to be male or female. if its the fish you are talking about then its because the dominate male has died (killed ect) and a female in the group under goes a sex change to take his place but not because of envir change...
    \"Nepenthes, the Devil's Cup\" - Santos
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    The sex of many reptiles is strongly influenced by the temp the eggs are kept at.

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    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Lots of stuff can change sexes; I know frogs do, in addition to the animals mentioned. Plants can, as well - certain sexed plants can swap sexes, and asexual plants (those that have both types of flowers) can differentiate into monosexual specimens. These changes are usually the result of stress or shock. As far as I can remember, these changes are usually permanent.
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    killerplantsguy's Avatar
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    Interesting thought, Joel. I know that Catasetum orchids have female flowers in bright sun and produce male flowers in the shade.

    I've heard many times that male Nepenthes plants are more common, but never with any explanation.

    KPG
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    It's an old thread, but looking at the recent posts about the N. aristolochioides flower, I wanted to revive discussion on this matter. Some time ago (and I can't find the thread), someone posted about an ugly-as-sin Nepenthes. The odd thing about this plant is that besides a typical male raceme, it seems to have put out what looked like a single female flower. This was borne out of a side node and it got my curiosity going. Is it possible that under certain circumstances, a nepenthes can change sex or that the genes for the opposite sex lie dormant and can lead to a female flower? It is something that's been eating at me and would love to see further research done on what controls the gender in this genus.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 12-12-2010 at 01:26 PM. Reason: Nomenclature adjustment
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    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    This is a great topic! Something I have thought about at length as well...

    There is that rumor that most Nepenthes in cultivation seem to be male for some reason. This makes me wonder if perhaps there is some aspect of our cultivation techniques that are mostly all similar that leads to the commonness of males. Perhaps its something about being further away from the equator that certain UV's or magnetic influences are different enough to produce predominantly male plants.

    But I really do think that it could be possible to manipulate a Nepenthes into being female if it were in the TC stage, or otherwise. Most other plants can do that, and many animals as well. Why should Nepenthes be any different? The real struggle is that Nepenthes are just so slow growing and have completely arbitrary (as far as we know) flowering patterns.

    I really hope that someone who has a TC lab and lots of time does a lengthy study on this!
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

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    They are not the same of course, however Cannabis is also a dioecious (separate sexed) plant where females are most sought after. I have read that in the high tech seed market GA3 (gibberellic acid) is being used on Cannabis seed to "feminize" them and ensure that they will more likely grow into female plants. Also research has shown that cooler temps at germination is also said to cause a higher percentage of cannabis seed to mature as females. Perhaps these factors can be put to use on Neps.

    Someone could create a very low dose GA3 solution to try and misting & watering it onto a young Nep TC plantlet periodically as it grows to maturity and see what happens. Even better, add some GA3 powder into part of their flasking medium and see if it causes sex change in a known sex clone when they do their explant divisions. Then they would nearly be "re-germinating" in a GA3 infused medium. But yeah, even if someone got started today it'd be 2-5 years to see if it works.

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