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Thread: Some basic Genlisea questions

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    Just two quick questions:

    First, Genlisea is from tropical habitats, so I'm guessing it doesn't have a temperature-related dormancy, but does it have a dryness-induced one, where it dies back in the dry season?

    Second, does anyone fertilizer their Genlisea, and if so, with what?

    Mokele
    \"With malleus aforethought, mammals got an earful of their ancestor's jaw.\"
    --J. Burns, on the evolution of auditory ossicles.

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    Hey Mokele,

    There are around 20 species of Genlisea, growing in different habitats and following different ecological strategies. Many are highland plants which don't like heat. Some are annuals. Some like it very wet, others like it humid.
    So it depends which species you have...

    Best Wishes,
    Fernando Rivadavia

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    From my experience I can say that most all species prefer to be constantly wet to some degree. I usually fill the tray and then don't add water again until it is empty.

    The majority of species that experience drough in their habitat are the annuals and their survival method is to come back from seed. In cultivation they behave as perrenials for the most part though some (specifically lobata in my experience) seem to consistantly expire after blooming.

    As for fertilizer, I used to apply a very dilute solution by misting but gave it up as it seemed to do more to promote algae growth than actually help the plant.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Specifically, hispidula, lobata, and violacea, since those seem to be passed around. My violacea died while sending up a stalk. My hispidula is currently flowering and I have set up like a ghetto version of Geoff Wong's, in Savage Garden.

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    hispidula hangs on forever for me. I have one that is 6 years old and still going strong
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

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    NECPS President Dave S.'s Avatar
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    I have had genlisea leaves turn yellow after flowering and die back, but then new leaves can come back from the traps.

    In the past, I have used natural pond water which has more nutrients than rain water, but now I strictly use rainwater or R/O water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]So it depends which species you have...
    It's a G. lobata x violacea I got about a month ago. I've avoided fertilizing it so far, and it doesn't seem to be doing too badly, I wanted to know if I should keep it covered while fertilizing adjacent plants, and whether to induce any form of dormancy or not (it's indoors under lights, so no natural means of inducing it).

    Mokele
    \"With malleus aforethought, mammals got an earful of their ancestor's jaw.\"
    --J. Burns, on the evolution of auditory ossicles.

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    NECPS President Dave S.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Mokele @ April 18 2006,6:58)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] to induce any form of dormancy or not (it's indoors under lights, so no natural means of inducing it).
    I keep my lowland genlisea terrarium in summer mode all the time. I do not alter the temperature or photoperiod and my genlisea have been growing fine for years. I don't think trying to induce a dormancy period is a good idea. I think you would have a bigger chance losing it by trying to make it go dormant.

    The species I grow are G. hispidula, G. lobata and G. violacea 'Giant'.

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