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Thread: Utricularia, section Orchidioides - info sharing & discussion

  1. #51
    just your friendly neighborhood INTJ... amphirion's Avatar
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    those neighbors!
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
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    Here is a leaf from Utric. geminiloba, the base of the leaf stem was broken off a while back when I was repotting them. The clump there is from the tip of the leaf...really odd what plants can do.

    Utricularia geminiloba leaf tip

  3. #53
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    Wow, these are some awesome utrics! Congrats on the flowers!

    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    Finally!!?? I've 2 U. quelchii pieces that are still tiny after 1.5 years!! Seven months on one of the toughest utrics and you now get a flower stalk in the dead of winter. Priceless!
    Well after these 7 months I really wouldn't say this species is difficult. I think that if given proper highland conditions and kept vertically or any other way that ensures the right ammounts of water in the soil - is actually quite easy. Here's another interesting method to keep it:

    http://masozravky.com/images-blog/Ut...ilPasek_01.jpg

    Note that drainpipe-like thing. He also added some sand to the soil mix. Maybe that would be helpful; the rocks erode easily on the tepuis, and maybe sand gets blown onto the branches where U.campbelliana grows. I think that the myth of this species being very hard to grow is due to it rarity in cultivation; please note that most people that grow it in the right conditions can get it to flower.

    As for U.quelchii - I think it takes a lot of time for this species to get a good growth speed. I waited ca. 200 days for the first (!) new leaf to emerge on my plant (I received a single-leafed plantlet). Here's a photo I took during summer:


  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSS View Post
    The clump there is from the tip of the leaf...really odd what plants can do.
    RSS: Very interesting with that U. geminiloba leaf! What's the scale on that (ie: how long is the part of the leaf that we see?)?

    You're having U. endresii & U. geminiloba plants sprout from leaves laying around in your tanks and I can't get a sprout from a nice thick U. quelchii leaf to save my life! Next time I have a leaf fall off, it looks like I should ship it over to you!

    Quote Originally Posted by moof View Post
    Well after these 7 months I really wouldn't say this species is difficult. I think that if given proper highland conditions and kept vertically or any other way that ensures the right ammounts of water in the soil - is actually quite easy.
    I agree that getting the right conditions dialed-in is usually a big part of the attempt to grow one of these plants - but getting and keeping those conditions is still a challenge. For the last few years, I tried to grow D. villosa from seed. Some of my plants grew well, but most struggled - even when side-by-side with ones growing well. Many others have no issues with these plants. I changed more conditions with these plants than I ever have. I finally gave up and donated the plants to another - could not find the 'secret'.

    Then there's summer vs winter. My N. jamban was producing 3-4" leaves last winter and slowed down so much that it lost all it's pitchers and the leaves were down to 1.5" (maybe). As soon as cooler temps hit, it started growing again and is now making 6" leaves.

    Your pics & descriptions give me hope that I can yet find decent conditions for a campy. My last attempt with seed was a miserable failure (I attempted to grow it with media laden with moss spores - aaarrrrghhhh!!) but maybe I'll learn & have better results the 2nd time around ....

    Quote Originally Posted by moof View Post
    As for U.quelchii - I think it takes a lot of time for this species to get a good growth speed. I waited ca. 200 days for the first (!) new leaf to emerge on my plant (I received a single-leafed plantlet).
    Some point in the near future I'll have to share pics of my current U. quelchii's. Two remnant pieces have tormented me but another, received this fall with one leaf, has put out another similarly-sized leaf as well as several smaller ones near the base. In addition, it is currently sending up a 3rd larger leaf. Exactly why my other 2 remain stalled at a tiny size when the same clone in Av's care has surged into growth - remains a mystery ..... (to me anyway).

    Three other unrelated updates:
    - one of the developing leaves on the U. geminiloba (pics in the U. geminiloba thread) growing in LFS has surged and is approximately 3 times higher than the others (~3" high). The developing leaf in the peat-based mix appears to have almost stopped growing - even though the pots are next to each other & receive exactly the same treatment.
    - the U. asplundii I recently mounted on the treefern slab has added another small leaf & two aerial / wandering roots have appeared. The unfurling, longer leaf has continued to develop as the plant apparently was not setback from the disturbance. Hopefully, it will continue to be happy in it's new home hanging on the side of the tank. I recently purchased a few more treefern slabs and may take the plunge to mount the U. jamesoniana on one (all of the new slabs are amazingly dense).
    - yesterday, while showing another CP person my crude setups, I took the opportunity to check on the health of one of my U. reniformis pots that I've allowed to become almost bone-dry. The thick, rennie-style rolons were very healthy and firm even as the media was close to bone dry (I'm drying out 3 of my larger ('Big Sister'-esque size) pots of U. reniformis over the winter to try & induce blooms in the spring).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++
    Later edit / addition: while wandering through Bob's photofinder, I came across this comment over here from Barry on U. jamesoniana:
    I've had something of a breakthrough with this species the last year or so. I've put the plant in a basket, and continue to water it from above. The plant grows well (but slowly) in the top of the basket, but once tiny little stolons made it to the bottom of the basket they are going insane with growth. I've currently got about 7-10 flowers at any time now, all emerging from the bottom of the basket.
    I then located a pic of his basket over here. This would seem to make a strong statement of support for Peter's thoughts on growing U. campbelliana vertically & gives me a push further on mounting my plant on a treefern slab ..... hmmmm...
    ++++++++++++++++++++++
    Later, later edit
    Went ahead & mounted the U. jamesoniana on treefern slab (01.09.11). One added benefit was that when removing the chunk of LFS containing the james, I uncovered the largest leaf yet. Here's the mounted plant w/ approx 5 leaves (upper left one was buried):
    Last edited by RL7836; 01-09-2011 at 08:04 PM.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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  5. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    RSS: Very interesting with that U. geminiloba leaf! What's the scale on that (ie: how long is the part of the leaf that we see?)?

    You're having U. endresii & U. geminiloba plants sprout from leaves laying around in your tanks and I can't get a sprout from a nice thick U. quelchii leaf to save my life! Next time I have a leaf fall off, it looks like I should ship it over to you!
    The leaf is just a hair over 1/4", I had to get out the macro stuff for that pic.

  6. #56
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    Hi,
    Good to see that U.jamesoniana does well on the treefern slab! And I think you sure have good conditions for U.campbelliana, it's really not that hard to grow as most people think. You just need to figure out a good method to keep it. As for the vertical position, there's other plants (not only CPs) that like growing vertically - the position of the plant can be an important ecological factor. Of course that's just one way to do it, some people have great success with these utrics growing them in a normal, horizontal orientation. In nature, U.campbelliana likes to grow vertically, what's more - the flowerstalk looks to be adapted to such growth. When kept horizontally, it lies on the ground or even needs to be propped up. And here's what it does in it's natural habitat:

    http://www.wistuba.com/images/dsc2196_579.jpg

    Peter

  7. #57

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    Here is one of my Utric. humboldtii looking for a new home. Guess I need to set a pot over there .

    Utricularia humboldtii

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    I've been wanting to document the foliage on most of my big utrics for a while, so today was the day - & I also have a few questions for the other growers... (also, if you haven't checked the past few posts for a bit, i've been sneaking in a few revisions - ie: james mounting...).

    Quote Originally Posted by RSS View Post
    Here is one of my Utric. humboldtii looking for a new home. Guess I need to set a pot over there .
    I'll see your humbo aerial stolon and raise it 10 U. nelumbifolia aerial stolons (give or take):



    The three main U. humboldtii clones I'm now growing: (like the U. nelumbifolia above, were repotted in the fall into 4' x 4" x 4" net pots - that Av previously pictured).

    U. humboldtii - misc clones from BCP (the top 4 leaves have grown since being repotted):


    U. humboldtii - Broad Leaf, Cerro Neblina from BCP (still somewhat clumped up from the 2.5" pot):


    U. humboldtii from the Barry/Travis seed giveaway - one of 3 seed clones. This is the oldest & largest humbo I have. Until about 2 weeks ago, it was growing like it was on steroids after the repotting into a net pot. Then, all of a sudden, two leaves wilted and most of the new growth stopped. My sense is that the lower humidity closer to the lights helped cause a downturn. Although I'm not sure that this is the cause, I've seen this a few times as my humbo's seem sensitive to changes in humidity - more so than U. nelumbifolia growing next to them. I've relocated it into the big tank to try & give it some more head room (this lack of vertical space is an issue for me). The tallest bent leaf is one of the oldest and was wired down to keep from frying in the lights (as you can see from the bend):


    My little U. 'jitka'. The bad thing is that it is still so small, the good thing is that I received it with 2-3 tiny leaves, which then dropped to only one leaf and it has now rebounded - so it's heading in the right direction:


    U. geminiloba in LFS - updated pic with newest big leaf:


    U. quelchii - misc clone from BCP. It arrived this fall with the large, light-colored leaf - all of the others are recent additions:


    Here's a U. alpina that has grown incredibly well since I received it this summer (recognize this Andrew?) (in a 3" modified pot - sides are sliced for aeration):


    U. endresii from BCP - not as robust as I would like (or as good-looking as RSS):


    U. alpina x humboldtii (maybe - not yet confirmed by flower - it may be another U. alpina - but all leaves are smaller than the other U. alpina's...) - this plant was potted from a small offshoot with one leaf (the yellowing one) that had escaped into the LFS growing around the pot. Since repotting, it has really surged (as you can see):


    U. endresii x alpina - confirmed commercial plant (BCP?) - this plant is a beast. It has taken a real liking to growing out the sides of the net pot:


    ..... close-up of some of the newer growth coming out the side:


    U. asplundii:


    .... winger:


    With many/most of my plants (when possible), I have planted one division into 100% live LFS and another in an 'open' peat mix. Without fail, every plant in the peat mix has been dramatically smaller than it's relative in the LFS. I suspect that it is my interpretation of the proportion of the ingredients in the mix. In my hands, the peat mixes all seem to be too dense and do not allow the good air permeability that the LFS provides (& net pots further enhance). Below is a U. asplundii that has been growing in a peat mix for ~1.5 years - yes - it only has 2 small leaves - around 1" tall. This pattern is repeated in net pots and regular pots. I will probably be repotting these into LFS soon (& maybe trying a few into super-open Nep-type mixes - like RSS):


    An unrelated question: what are the growers, who are growing under lights, using as a photoperiod - winter/summer? How gradually do you transition from one period to the other?
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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  9. #59
    Taliesin-DS's Avatar
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    Amazing utrics
    my growlist: http://terraforums.com/forums/showth...306#post976306
    My pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/taliesin-ds/

    <Exo> @Talie......You are the lord of all things blah....

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    I'm not using a summer/winter transition, mainly because I'm lazy and forgetful.

    Something I noticed, your U. endressii leaves look thicker than mine. We both have the same clone so it can't be that. I'm getting larger leaves but they are thinner.

    No fair your Jikta is larger than mine now!

    I just moved a U. reniformis into a Nep type mix, I think it will do better in there.

    Nice group of Utric's there, sure makes most of mine look tiny.

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