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Thread: anyone grow utricularia from seed?

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    J NewspaperFort's Avatar
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    anyone grow utricularia from seed?

    i am growing U. juncea, and am worried my media may be a little too dry. i am growing it like i do my seeds of anything else. well moist medie to begin with, then constant misting, and weekly bottom-watering.


    any suggestions? the seeds were tiny and the seedlings will undoubtedly be tiny, so i fear any signs of growth will go unnoticed before i can make any needed changes to my method.

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    jesse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewspaperFort View Post
    i am growing U. juncea, and am worried my media may be a little too dry. i am growing it like i do my seeds of anything else. well moist medie to begin with, then constant misting, and weekly bottom-watering.

    any suggestions?
    I think that U. juncea / cornuta is indeed more to be cultivated like semi-aquatic species rather than real terrestials: Wet.

    Although I did not start with seeds but received a small patch of U. cornuta, I have had no big success with that Utricularia, I just can keep it alive. It never flowered for me in three years now. It hardly grows. I think I should cultivate flooded for good amounts of the year to make them happy.

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    does this rag smell like chloroform to you? boxofrain's Avatar
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    been trying

    to do the same. I purchased packs of seeds for 6 different plants (3 Genlisia). Only one of the batches sprouted, the U. Monanthos. It has since flowered and is putting up another stalk now.
    I treated them the same as you did.
    I think my seed days are numbered, it is much easier to buy well established plugs.
    "the memories of a man in his old age, are the deeds of a man in his prime"

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I did U. bisquamata, once. It took several weeks to germinate.

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    J NewspaperFort's Avatar
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    yes I previously tried genlisea (hispidula) and utricularia subulata as well, and as far as I can tell I got no results.


    unless this is carnivorous:

    I intended to post a better picture of that in the plant ID forum..


    & thank you for your reply jim

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    31drew31's Avatar
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    Im not sure what the name of plant is in your last photo, but I always get it in my dried sphagnum. I pluck it out.

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    jesse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewspaperFort View Post
    utricularia subulata as well, and as far as I can tell I got no results.
    Don't worry, be happy!

    I find it strange that people want such a invasive pest like U. subulata in their collections.

    Although CP literature tells that they are yellow flowering plants, I must say that most clones of U. subulata only show cleistogamous flowers that do not open under typical cultivation conditions, but they set seeds anyway and they tend to spread into every pot of your CP collection.

    So on the long run each of your pots with Utricularia species become mixed species pots: The original species and U. subulata growing in one pot. You never will be able to seperate them. Very annoying!

    I never have purchased any U. subulata, but a growing number of my pots get infected with U. subulata. It's hard to exterminate from your collection, once your collection has become infiltrated with U. subulata.

    A nice Utricularia species in cultivation to grow from seed is U. calycifida. Nice leaves, nice flowers. And not invasive.

    Here is a picture of U. subulata, fully "flowering" under cultivation conditions:

    You can see flowers in all stages: Flowers being in buds, fully flowering (cleistogamous) and seed capsules.
    The only thing that is missing for a perfect plant in cultivation: Opened, yellow flowers.
    I tried different cultivation conditions, but perhaps only 1 out of 200 flowers will open.
    199 out of 200 stay closed all the time and are cleistogamous, but they also develop invasive seeds.
    For me it's just a pest in the collection.
    OK, but if you like what you see on this "flowering" picture of U. subulata, then U. subulata is for you.
    U. subulata is very easy to keep and is "flowering" nearly all the time.
    Last edited by jesse; 12-12-2011 at 06:06 AM.

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    mobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NewspaperFort View Post
    [...] utricularia subulata as well, and as far as I can tell I got no results.
    Most of us try to keep this out of our collection, rather than introduce it

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