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Thread: U. bisquamata?

  1. #9

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    Not at all, it is just that it may go into your other pots as well if the seeds from the flowers spread. Personally I don't mind and let it grow wherever it wants, although it doesn't spread for me.

  2. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanukimo View Post
    From what I would guess, it would be pretty difficult to find a habitat where CPs would thrive, right? It would necessarily need to be where there already are CPs growing, and that would only be on the East or West Coast, I think. Or are there instances where CPs have become invasive where there previously were none? That would be really interesting.
    Pitcher plants occur along the east coast, down through the Gulf Coast states into Texas (Sarracenia), and then also on the west coast (Darlingtonia). Johnny mentioned a case where Drosera capensis (invasive) has colonized habitats with Darlingtonia. I think it's a safe bet that some of the aquatic Utricularia have invaded areas previously uncolonized as long as they can survive in the climate, though I have no definitive data to back that up.

    Actually, on a quick search, it appears U. gibba is considered introduced to Hawaii according to the USDA.

  3. #11
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanukimo View Post
    From what I would guess, it would be pretty difficult to find a habitat where CPs would thrive, right? It would necessarily need to be where there already are CPs growing, and that would only be on the East or West Coast, I think. Or are there instances where CPs have become invasive where there previously were none? That would be really interesting.
    The problem is, the people going to these places to check out wild cp's usually grow cp's themselves. Because of this, it's verly likely that stray seeds could find their way into the perfect spot. Some of these weedier plants produce a profusion of very tiny seeds which makes it very easy for them to hitch a ride and be distributed.

  4. #12
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanukimo View Post
    From what I would guess, it would be pretty difficult to find a habitat where CPs would thrive, right? It would necessarily need to be where there already are CPs growing, and that would only be on the East or West Coast, I think. Or are there instances where CPs have become invasive where there previously were none? That would be really interesting.
    The problem is, the people going to these places to check out wild cp's usually grow cp's themselves. Because of this, it's verly likely that stray seeds could find their way into the perfect spot. Some of these weedier plants produce a profusion of very tiny seeds which makes it very easy for them to hitch a ride and be distributed.

  5. #13

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    I love the little weedy Utrics, and have/do grow some of them. With that said...remove it from your random pots, if you want to grow them COMPLETELY isolate them from the rest of your collection, I'm talking about a glass box or something extreme.

    If/when you get into trading it is bad form to send any of these species to anyone without them requesting them.

    There are plenty of Texas rivers full of beautifully grown Cryptocoryne species, its really a sight to see, and they are a lot harder to keep alive then the weedy Utrics. If Crypts can get a foothold its only a matter of time, if it hasn't already happened.

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSS View Post
    If/when you get into trading it is bad form to send any of these species to anyone without them requesting them.
    I second that. Because I acquired a couple of potted Sarracenia from a SoCal CP nursery three years ago -- pots loaded with hitchhiking U. bisquamata -- I've got the #%@$! stuff throughout my Sarracenia pots. It's not so bad in adult pots; you can kinda ignore it, but when it gets into seedling trays, it's a very real pest.

    Do not share U. bisquamata with people when trading without first warning them that you have the species infesting your collection!

  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu138 View Post
    The problem is, the people going to these places to check out wild cp's usually grow cp's themselves. Because of this, it's verly likely that stray seeds could find their way into the perfect spot. Some of these weedier plants produce a profusion of very tiny seeds which makes it very easy for them to hitch a ride and be distributed.
    U. gibba has gotten established in Hawaii. It is apparently now found growing in wet open fields. Ephemeral wet areas. Maybe water birds helping to spread around. Hard to say how well things will move once it gets established.

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