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Thread: Starting an Utric Aquarium

  1. #9
    ChronoKiento's Avatar
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    Axelrod12, I'm definitely interested in the frogbit if you have any to spare! I need to wait a few days to let all the peat settle, but I should be ready for it within a week or so. I'm worried that the water is going to stay the murky brown color that it is now. I think maybe I should have rinsed the peat a bit beforehand, I was concerned that I'd be washing away necessary tannins and such. I scooped all of the floating peat off the top and I'm hoping now that the water will clear up some. At the moment I don't think anything can grow in it. Of course, the U. gibba I ordered came in today. I wasn't expecting it so soon so I had to make a separate container for it for the time being. It was a pretty big clump so I split it up in case some dies. Maybe I am underestimating it though.

    As for the mosquito larvae, I don't think many utrics have traps large enough to eat them. I'm not sure since I've never grown it myself, but I don't think U. graminifolia is one of the ones that does. I'll have to thwart the mosquitoes some other way. My pool (which has been more of a pond for the past 5 or 6 years) doesn't give us any mosquito problems so if I introduce a little water from that into my aquarium, whatever is eating the mosquito larvae in the pool (unless it is the frogs that live in the pool) will eat the ones in the aquarium too.
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    Axelrod12's Avatar
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    Just shoot me a PM when you're ready for it. I'll ship it out. In my experience you are probably underestimating the gibba, it's been nearly indestructible in just about any condition I've put it in. As for the mosquito larvae maybe some mosquito dunks would work. I know when I started to get some fungus gnats I found it recommended to put them in water trays. Not sure exactly how it'd function in a tank with utrics though. Maybe someone with more experience could chime in here.

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    I agree, you seem to be underestimating the gibba. It should be fine to put it in the tank even while the peat is still there. And there is nothing wrong with the water being brown - it means tannins are in the water, which may inhibit algae. Utricularia graminifolia will not catch mosquito larvae even if the traps were large enough because it is an affixed aquatic, but most aquatic utrics, such as macrorhiza and inflata, should have large enough bladders. There are some variants of gibba with larger traps that may be able to trap them as well.

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    ChronoKiento's Avatar
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    I'm more worried about the water blocking out the sun, it's not just brown, it's pretty much black. I put a portion of the U. gibba in the tank to see if it in fact could survive, and I very quickly lost it. It's only floating just below the surface but I still can't see it. The U. gibba that I have is definitely not large enough to eat mosquito larvae, but I think that it is probably a juvenile.
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    Axelrod12's Avatar
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    You could try changing out some of the tannin stained water with some clean water. It may stir up some peat but that will settle and the tannins will get diluted. At a certain point they don't leech as heavily.

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    You can always run an airstone. Mosquitos won't lay eggs in moving water.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChronoKiento View Post
    I'm more worried about the water blocking out the sun, it's not just brown, it's pretty much black. I put a portion of the U. gibba in the tank to see if it in fact could survive, and I very quickly lost it. It's only floating just below the surface but I still can't see it. The U. gibba that I have is definitely not large enough to eat mosquito larvae, but I think that it is probably a juvenile.
    A light brown is pretty much the clearest the water will get without multiple water changes. The Utricularia will be floating on the surface for the most part, so it shouldn't be a problem unless you have other plants growing in the peat moss. Utricularia gibba doesn't grow larger bladders with age, so you probably have the variety with smaller bladders. However, newly hatched mosquito larvae are pretty small, so they should still be able to be caught by their tails. I wouldn't recommend putting an airstone just to agitate the water, because it would decrease the amount of CO2 in the water. To increase it you can try adding dead leaves to the water and letting them decay in your tank.

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanukimo View Post
    A light brown is pretty much the clearest the water will get without multiple water changes. The Utricularia will be floating on the surface for the most part, so it shouldn't be a problem unless you have other plants growing in the peat moss. Utricularia gibba doesn't grow larger bladders with age, so you probably have the variety with smaller bladders. However, newly hatched mosquito larvae are pretty small, so they should still be able to be caught by their tails. I wouldn't recommend putting an airstone just to agitate the water, because it would decrease the amount of CO2 in the water. To increase it you can try adding dead leaves to the water and letting them decay in your tank.
    100% wrong about the CO2. Think about it. During the day, the plants are using CO2 and releasing O2. Under those conditions, the water will contain less CO2 than water which is at equilibrium with the atmosphere above it. By running an airstone, you are pushing the balance back towards equilibrium, because the air has CO2 in it. If you were artificially supplementing CO2, you would be correct. If not, running an airstone during the day will increase the CO2 dissolved in the water.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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