User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 17 to 24 of 33

Thread: Starting an Utric Aquarium

  1. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Hacienda Heights, CA USA
    Posts
    1,374
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I asked my friend in the aquarium trade, and here is what he had to say:

    "You are adding CO2 into your water with surface agitation. By agitating the surface (like how the airstone is), it allows for more CO2 to dissolve and increases solubility. But since you're adding oxygen into the water with an airstone, it decreases the CO2 in the water. To add the most CO2 into the water, it would be best to only agitate the surface without adding oxygen....so for example adding a filter outflow which creates currents. This would allow for greater solubility of gases while not adding oxygen and allows for the water to contain a greater supply of carbon dioxide. I think by adding an airstone inside the water, you are obviously adding more oxygen than carbon dioxide."

    So the surface agitation from an airstone is beneficial, while the oxygen added is not. If you want the best of both worlds, you should consider adding something to increase the flow in your tank, like a power head perhaps, without injecting oxygen into the water. Surface agitation can also prevent films and proteins from building up on the surface of the water in addition to adding more CO2.

  2. #18
    ChronoKiento's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Pennsylvania z6
    Posts
    1,580
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not trying to do anything real complex with this (yet). Haha, but these are good ideas for the future.

    If in the next two days or so, the water doesn't clear up some, I will definitely do some water changes to see if I can make it a little less murky. Right now it's just ugly and I won't be able to grow anything in the peat like I am planning to.

    And mosquitoes were never really a huge concern for me since it's a small tank and I could also put a cover on it if it becomes too much of a problem I suppose. It's good to know that the U. gibba can eat the newly hatched buggers though.
    Growlist
    I'm back?

  3. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    North QLD Australia
    Posts
    170
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rubbish mossies won't lay eggs in flowing water, I have had mossie larvea in small tanks with a circulating system, plenty of movement (granted they preffer still, butthey are not confined to it), as for fish, I have a few ponds (the smallest being 15L that has U.Aurea, Gibba, Uliginosa (on the bottom) and stellaris, this small pond has a fighter fish in it and is going very well (many months on), my other ponds (in excess of 200L) have guppies, gold fish, Gudgeons and rainbow fish (Au species) and are all very happy, sedges are a good companion, as are sarracenia, but these are to large for you, a local plant called Nardoo works very well at countering algae, as do a few snail species that don't (often) feed on utrics.

    I must also add that I use a spag layer on the bottom of anything smaller than 25L, then peat on larger, adding a few old sarra leaves (cut up) will also increase tannins, CO2 and growth, but I would not advise this if algae is an issue.

    On a side note my Aurea and stellaris readilly catch small mossie Larvae, but that is primarilly the guppies job.

  4. #20
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tanukimo View Post
    I asked my friend in the aquarium trade, and here is what he had to say:

    "You are adding CO2 into your water with surface agitation. By agitating the surface (like how the airstone is), it allows for more CO2 to dissolve and increases solubility. But since you're adding oxygen into the water with an airstone, it decreases the CO2 in the water. To add the most CO2 into the water, it would be best to only agitate the surface without adding oxygen....so for example adding a filter outflow which creates currents. This would allow for greater solubility of gases while not adding oxygen and allows for the water to contain a greater supply of carbon dioxide. I think by adding an airstone inside the water, you are obviously adding more oxygen than carbon dioxide."

    So the surface agitation from an airstone is beneficial, while the oxygen added is not. If you want the best of both worlds, you should consider adding something to increase the flow in your tank, like a power head perhaps, without injecting oxygen into the water. Surface agitation can also prevent films and proteins from building up on the surface of the water in addition to adding more CO2.
    Your friend in the aquarium trade is not thinking clearly on the subject. He is not considering that the air being pumped into the water contains a certain ratio of O2 to CO2, and that the water it's being pumped into contains a different ratio of these gases, one which is poorer in CO2 because of the plants using it and releasing O2. In essence, by pumping in a mix which is richer in CO2 than that dissolved in the water, you're not driving off excess CO2, you're driving off excess O2. Talk to someone who understands the physics of partial gas pressure to get a better handle on what's happening. I've worked in the aquarium trade for a long time and still get a kick out of some of the "wisdom" dispensed by other professionals. Seriously, let a physics or chemistry professor read my posts and see with whom he/she agrees.
    Last edited by SubRosa; 04-24-2014 at 05:22 AM.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  5. #21
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Adelea View Post
    Rubbish mossies won't lay eggs in flowing water, I have had mossie larvea in small tanks with a circulating system, plenty of movement (granted they preffer still, butthey are not confined to it), as for fish, I have a few ponds (the smallest being 15L that has U.Aurea, Gibba, Uliginosa (on the bottom) and stellaris, this small pond has a fighter fish in it and is going very well (many months on), my other ponds (in excess of 200L) have guppies, gold fish, Gudgeons and rainbow fish (Au species) and are all very happy, sedges are a good companion, as are sarracenia, but these are to large for you, a local plant called Nardoo works very well at countering algae, as do a few snail species that don't (often) feed on utrics.

    I must also add that I use a spag layer on the bottom of anything smaller than 25L, then peat on larger, adding a few old sarra leaves (cut up) will also increase tannins, CO2 and growth, but I would not advise this if algae is an issue.

    On a side note my Aurea and stellaris readilly catch small mossie Larvae, but that is primarilly the guppies job.
    I know that the buckets I aerate to culture daphnia don't get wrigglers, and the ones I leave stagnant to attract mosquitos do.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  6. #22

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Hacienda Heights, CA USA
    Posts
    1,374
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Adelea View Post
    Rubbish mossies won't lay eggs in flowing water, I have had mossie larvea in small tanks with a circulating system, plenty of movement (granted they preffer still, butthey are not confined to it), as for fish, I have a few ponds (the smallest being 15L that has U.Aurea, Gibba, Uliginosa (on the bottom) and stellaris, this small pond has a fighter fish in it and is going very well (many months on), my other ponds (in excess of 200L) have guppies, gold fish, Gudgeons and rainbow fish (Au species) and are all very happy, sedges are a good companion, as are sarracenia, but these are to large for you, a local plant called Nardoo works very well at countering algae, as do a few snail species that don't (often) feed on utrics.

    I must also add that I use a spag layer on the bottom of anything smaller than 25L, then peat on larger, adding a few old sarra leaves (cut up) will also increase tannins, CO2 and growth, but I would not advise this if algae is an issue.

    On a side note my Aurea and stellaris readilly catch small mossie Larvae, but that is primarilly the guppies job.
    It is so nice that you are able to grow so many native species of Utricularia. Many species in the US are very difficult to acquire (especially affixed aquatics).

  7. #23
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,484
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Tanukimo View Post
    I asked my friend in the aquarium trade, and here is what he had to say:

    "You are adding CO2 into your water with surface agitation. By agitating the surface (like how the airstone is), it allows for more CO2 to dissolve and increases solubility. But since you're adding oxygen into the water with an airstone, it decreases the CO2 in the water. To add the most CO2 into the water, it would be best to only agitate the surface without adding oxygen....so for example adding a filter outflow which creates currents. This would allow for greater solubility of gases while not adding oxygen and allows for the water to contain a greater supply of carbon dioxide. I think by adding an airstone inside the water, you are obviously adding more oxygen than carbon dioxide."

    So the surface agitation from an airstone is beneficial, while the oxygen added is not. If you want the best of both worlds, you should consider adding something to increase the flow in your tank, like a power head perhaps, without injecting oxygen into the water. Surface agitation can also prevent films and proteins from building up on the surface of the water in addition to adding more CO2.
    I posited this scenario on a chemistry forum. To anyone interested:http://www.physicsforums.com/showthr...39#post4728939
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  8. #24
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    These pictures are a few years old and my Aldrovanda died out, but I had Aldrovanda & U. gibba set up in a 10 gallon tank, on the porch. I used the bog water that was nearby and they flourished. Snails naturally came with the water. I also used a couple bog plants.












    I didn't have an algae problem, presumably because the U. gibba (and possibly snails) partially blocked the light.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •