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Thread: d. 'King Henry' hitch hikers -- ID?

  1. #9
    w03's Avatar
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    If you want to keep it, I would recommend you rip every trace of it out and pot it up by itself, quarantined away from other plants.

    Don't worry about damaging the stolons - it'll regenerate even from minute pieces left in the soil.
    Last edited by w03; 04-20-2015 at 05:27 AM.
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    I second Ron's comments on this species. Be VERY careful what you ask for. Both bisquamata and subulata are the Kudzu of Utricularia; once you have them, you may never be rid of them. That's why CC plants always ship with one or both species infesting the pots. My recommendation is to remove the top inch of soil and discard it immediately, before the pest can start to replicate.

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    w03's Avatar
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    On another note, if you do decide to keep it, make sure it doesn't get anywhere near other pots of utrics. Once you get it mixed in with another utric, they'll become an entangled mass of indistinguishable stolons that you'll never be able to sort out.
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  4. #12
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Actually U. bisquamata isn't that difficult to get rid of in a pot with a single plant. U. bisquamata needs lots of light so if you cover the top of the pot with something opaque like foil, mylar or even black plastic with a small opening for the plant and the pot in another opaque container (tray) the Utricularia will eventually die.

    I found this out from a pot of Drosera aliciae from the same nursery that was infested with U. bisquamata. The colony of Drosera eventually covered the entire top surface of the pot cutting off light to the U. bisquamata. When I got around to repotting the plants there wasn't a trace of the Utricularia in the substrate. Nor has it re-occurred in any of the pots that the D. aliciae was repotted into.

    Exactly how long it takes to die off is unknown (experimentation is needed) but I would repot the Dionaea now and cover the the surface as described above and keep it covered for a minimum of two months. Clean as much of he substrate from the roots and corm of the flytrap and rinse well in distilled or RO filtered water.

    If you wish to grow the Utricularia you need to keep the pot well away from your other pots and in a separate water tray as the stolons can travel out of the drain holes and infest other pots. You also need to aggressively control the seed production by clipping or pulling out the flowers before the seed capsules form.

    Or you could plant some Drosera aliciae in the pot and let it cover the surface. But if you're not careful with the flowers and seed of the Drosera you could end up with an infestation of D. aliciae in your collection.
    Last edited by Not a Number; 04-20-2015 at 06:32 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    Actually U. bisquamata isn't that difficult to get rid of in a pot with a single plant.
    Although 'difficulty' is a relative concept, this approach would appear to have merit - thanks for sharing.

    I have a tiny sprig of U. longifolia (at least that's what I believe it is) in a N. tenuis pot that has defied my efforts of eradication for years. This approach may work here. Another similar invader recently appeared in a long-established pot of U. reniformis. I should be able to take a small division away from the infested area to eliminate it. Thankfully, I don't have media covered with thousands of seeds to deal with nor hundreds of infested potted plants.

    Out of curiosity, I've potted up the invader from the U. reniformis pot. I have not grown U. longifolia for years & the last I allowed any to flower was ~3-5 years ago (iirc). I have to respect the amazing tenacity of that little survivor ...

    Back on topic: It's good to know that U. bisquamata relies mostly on an amazingly prolific self-seeding strategy & not so much on a robust plant able to tolerate poor conditions. I believe U. subulata is similar but a little more insidious because it can hide it's seed production through cleistogamy.
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    I removed some of it and repotted away from my other utrics, thanks for all the help!

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