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Thread: U. alpina

  1. #17
    Copper's Avatar
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    I was under the impression that longifolia did not and the 'plant that came as alpina' deffinately does have tubers. You said your was showing tubers as well?

    My alpina also has short leaf stalks (decending to a point). There are a few showing in the picture. I had just moved this plant to the larger pot a couple of weeks ago and a lot of the stalks that were showing are buried now.
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

  2. #18

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    Rose,
    Yea, my plant has 1 or 2 small tubers. I just transplanted it to a clear plastic case like thing, so i could see whats going on beneath the soil [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/laugh.gif[/img] , thanks,
    Kevin
    Kevin Peterson
    Grosse Pointe, MI

  3. #19

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    The traps are wuite a bit different as well, but you would need to look at them at about 20x magnification.

    The leaf is going to be the easiest way, if baby leaves look like small versions of adult leaves it is probably U. longifolila. If they are curled up and unroll into adult leaves it is U. alpina or a related species.

    U. longifolia is not supposed to have tubers. What do the tubers you are seeing look like?

  4. #20
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    I agree, the images I've seen except for Dodecs image look like U. longifolia. I've been sold U. longifolia as U. alpina countless times. I have a nice sized rootbound pot of the real deal growing in my highland chamber now but I had to import it from Germany to finally get the real plant correctly IDd. The leaves of U. alpina are angular/diamond shaped when fully expanded: -<>. When alpina leaves are small they resemble a "Y" shape and unroll from the top as they grow/expand. they then turn very thick and leathery with definate veins.

    U. longifolias leaves are more "oblong" with a less pointed more club shaped leaf tip that does not start out as a "Y" but looking just like a very small adult leaf. Veins on U. longifolia are not so well defined and the leaves are quite thin and flimsy.

    Dodec asked a good question: What shape are the tubers on your plants?

  5. #21

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    Hey,
    The tubers appear to be white and small... and from tghat, the leaves appear, and growing downward are the stems, with the bladders.
    Kevin
    Kevin Peterson
    Grosse Pointe, MI

  6. #22
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    What shape are the tubers: round, triangular, tubular, rhizome like? Does the tuber appear to be the main stalk of the root system or are they sticking off the main root system as a seperate entity? From your description it sounds like you are describing the creeping stolon from the soil surface. This is not a tuber.

    If you will PM me the name of the place you got it I may be able to tell you whether they're really selling U. alpina. Because as I say, I've been burned plenty of times on this plant myself. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img]

  7. #23
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    Swords,

    He got the plant from me and I received it from purplesundew, who is no longer here. The tubers I see are off of the main root (not part of), but they are somewhat elongated. The alpina ones are roundish, is this correct?

    You state that the leave begin in a furled up "Y", is this correct? If so, my 'plant that came as alpina' does not do that. Those that received this plant from me (I think there are three) please PM. I will attempt to get this plant and will get some to you asap.
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

  8. #24
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    I too think these plants look like longifolia and my longifolia plants have a trendancy to make plantlets on their leaf tips from time to time. Dodec is quite correct that the best way to tell these plants apart is by looking at new leaves. Looking at the pictures I don't see any thing that resembles the "rolled" embryonic leaf of a typical alpina. That plant labled alpina also seems a bit too dense for alpina, in my experience alpina tends to have its leaves all spread out. Swords also makes a good point that the leaves on alpina are very tough and leathery in feel.
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