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Thread: U. reniformis

  1. #9

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    Reniformis doesn't require a dormant period. It will grow quite happily with your highland neps all year. It has no true dormant period in the wild.

    However, some people believe that flowering is encouraged by allowing it to go dormant over winter. This would be as a response to a type of stress, rather than replication of natural conditions. In NY, you could just allow the temperatures to drop naturally as winter approaches and the plant will do what it wants by itself (bearing in mind not to let it freeze). It will start back into growth when the min temp rises to about 10C, which you could do artificially as and when you fancy seeing leaves again. Don't overwater it while dormant, and don't let it get stale in summer. I really don't recommend standing it in water.

    I would suggest growing the plant on without dormancy until you have enough of it to divide up. Then see how some pots of it respond to different regimes, keeping your backup.

    Best wishes.

    Rob.
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  2. #10
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Rob, thank you very much for the informative replies! They've really helped. It gets to around as a low of 10 at the elast to 15 at the most degrees C in my greenhouse at night. So i assume it should grow fine. Unless of course it shows signs of wanting to go to sleep that is. I will see how it goes. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

  3. #11
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    I just want to add a small adendum to Rob's comments. I have my clone of this growing in my sunporch where temps have dropped below freezing a couple nights and the plant has suffered no ill effects (i.e. the leaves are still present) so long as the day time temps rise enough
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  4. #12

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    To all (especially Rob),

    Here is yet another chapter of my never-ending crusade to disassociate U.reniformis from the epiphytic Utrics...

    Unfortunately in the past, popular CP books lumped U.reniformis together with epiphytic Utrics simply because of its size. It's true that there are 2 epiphytic species in its section (Section Iperua): U.nelumbifolia (exclusively epiphytic) and U.humboldtii (optional epiphytic). The 2 other species in its group (U.nephrophylla and U.geminiloba) are only known to grow as terrestrials.

    As for U.reniformis, I do not tire to say that 99.999% of the times it is TERRESTRIAL!!! The only case I know of where it was growing anything close to epiphytic was when a friend found some growing among dead leaves surrounding the base of a large terrestrial bromeliad.

    And for anybody wanting tips on cultivating this species, I'll repeat what I've said before: it's a very widespread species and it grows from sea level to nearly 3000m altitude, in boggy soil or nearly dry sand, from pure moss over rocks to coastal habitats which may be slightly salty, in alcaline to acidic conditions -- you name it, and it's there!

    So it would probably be best to ask WHERE they come from when somebody offers you plants. At least one thing they ALL have in common is a winter dry season. Since most are seen in flower in the winter, one can guess that either dry stress or photoperiod are responsible for flowering, but my field observations suggest its dry stress.

  5. #13
    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    So a winter rest period should be achieved with dry conditions. And this should be around the same time US. Sarracenia would go dormant I assume?

  6. #14

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    Thanks for the infos Fernando, they are very appreciated, as usual [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img] , and I will (try to) ban the idea that this plant is epiphytic in my mind [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/tounge.gif[/img]

  7. #15

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    Thanks for that Fernando - I knew that it wasn't epiphytic, but didn't fully grasp the wide range of soils it could be found in.

    Do you know what the winter temperatures are where it is found? I have never tried an enforced dry winter dormancy without an associated temperature drop (which for the clones I have had was the initiaiting factor for the dormancy).

    Cheers.

    Rob.
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    Rob Howe.

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  8. #16

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    It would be really difficult to give you winter temperatures because it grows from steamy sea level to almost 3000m where it probably even gets snow once in a while. So it really depends on where your plants come from I guess. I'm not sure I'd say it has a winter dormancy, although they may slow down some in autumn and winter. Usually the species in Section Iperua seem to grow like mad during early spring to early summer.

    Fernando

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