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Thread: Ummmmm.....help?

  1. #17
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Well Tamlin, thanks for the vote of confidence on asplundii. Yes indeed this plant always has tubers present, I find all the Orchidioides group do. I personally believe this trai has to do with their ability to grow as epiphytes but do take note that while D'Amato calls them epiphytes in reality none of the plants in the Orchidioides section is an obligate epiphyte and more often than not in the wild they will be growing as terrestrials. In cultivation they seem to respond better to an epiphyte based treatment but I believe this is because in nature their environment is not prone to the pure, waterlogged conditions that we associate with the "real" terrestrials. The terrestrial conditions that the Orchidioides experience is probably more akin to a normal house plant watering cycle, i.e. the soil dries out before getting a quick drench.

    I grow all my Orchidioides plants in LFS:live sphag overlaying a orchid bark:LFS mix. I top water about once every 7-10 days or when the live sphag looks like it needs it. My plants respond really well to this treatment and I have been successful getting single leaf with minimal stolon cuttings going with little effort in under this same treatment
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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  2. #18

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    I received mine yesterday. Not knowing really what to do with them I planted then in a peat/sand mix. What I'm wondering about is if I'm using this mix which is relatively sterile and I'm watering with rain water or deionized water, Is that little plug of soil that comes with them going to be enough to provide microbes for them to munch on Will that be enough to colonize the containers Iíve put them in?

    If not, is there a way to collect more? Can I go soak some soil from an unfertilized area in rainwater and strain the soil out of it and water them with that?

    Thanks
    Dan

  3. #19
    rattler's Avatar
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    thanks for your input Tamlin. they seem to be a plant ideally suited to me. i tend to get busy now and then and they dont seem to mind a lil bit of neglect. infact going by some of the disscutions ive followed on here it kicks some into a flowering cycle. as to the U. aueromaculata, thanks for your notes on it. i couldnt sleep before i left for Minneapolis(im at my fiancees' sisters hotel room for tonite, long story) and i looked up the others using Tim's website and it is the only one i couldnt find anything at all on. Jim i am now up to 18 Utrics with a couple more to be shipped to me next week after im back home. i love the lil things.

    Rattler
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  4. #20

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    regarding the watering with "soil water" my instincts go against the idea. It would be better to find a pond where there are numerous frogs. Frogs require a pristine water source to thrive, and that would be my choice. Remember, the nutrition from prey is only a help to them, not a necessity. Like all plants, photosynthesis is the main energy provider, prey just acts like fertilizer would.

    Glad to see you taking such a good interest in this genus Rattler. Over time we will all work together to replicate and place these species in more happy homes, I hope. Until recently there has been very little real interst in the plants here in the US, but this seems to be changing a little in recent years.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  5. #21
    rattler's Avatar
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    i think it helped that my first lil pinch of U. livida took off like wildfire. that great success right off the bat got me interested in them now im interested in the whole group, although a lil less so on the true aquatics. it also helps that their flowers are on par with the orchids that i have been growing for awhile.

    Rattler
    cervid serial killer
    Know guns, know peace, know safety. No guns, no peace, no safety
    I didn't get stimulated but he kept his promise on change, that's about all I got left!
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  6. #22

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    Hi guys, I'm happy that you are pleased with the plants.

    Regarding U. asplundii: I have found that this is the easiest plant from Sec. Orchidiodes to grow. I had it growing in a mix of sphagnum orchid bark and perlite, but I expect that it would be happy in any loose medium, maybe even pear/sand, but I would recommend against it. Do not try and force any utric from this section into dormancy, you will most likely kill it. Just water them like a normal house plant - wait for it to dry out then add water until it is soaked. When I unpotted mine to send out they had dozens of tubers and could probably go quite a long time without water if they had to.

    Regarding feeding methods. I would advise against it. If you wind up with pests in your utrics, they are extremely sensitive to pesticides (Orthene SP75 works really well, but is expensive and difficult to find). I have never fed my plants and they always seem to do okay.

    U. aureomaculata is a tricky one sometimes. When it grows it grows like crazy, but can be prone to dying off. You may want to try growing it in a .5-1cm layer of silica sand overtop a standard peat mix.

    Just a general note: never assume that any utric is correctly labeled, watch carefully when they flower, and try and check them against a copy of Taylor's monograph (either your own, or one that probably resides in your local university library). I tried to not send out plants that I doubted were correctly identified, but I was pretty tired when I was packing them and may have mislabeled the bag.

  7. #23
    IceDragon's Avatar
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    Ah got my plants today. I got 8 plants all together.
    U. bisquamata "Betty's Bay"
    flaccida
    delicatula
    nova-zealandia
    uliginosa
    erectiflora
    asplundii
    G. aurea
    woot now my collection is up to 12. Btw is there anything particulary hard to find, listed?

  8. #24

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    Ice Dragon,

    U. erectiflora is scarce in collections, and G. aurea is none too common.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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