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Thread: Alternative feeding

  1. #9
    7santiago's Avatar
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    now that i remember i have seen worn like insects in my lucky bamboo vase filled with water, wormens? i wonder if they can be fed to utricularia, and aqua-carivores by fear is that it could be a pest, they do tend to eat my precious bamboo roots [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/mad.gif[/img]
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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forums!

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    TheAlphaWolf,

    Very nice. I may try this. A few additional questions:

    1. What are the odds of cultivating organisms that EAT or are harmful to the aquatics if the water is from a pond that doesn't have aquatics growing in it? Have you run into this problem before?

    2. Are daphnia visible to the naked eye? I ask because in my first (and failed) attempt with Aldrovanda, I attempted to grow it in water collected from a local pond. It wasn't the pond water per se that led to their demise, but a water mold problem to due negligence on my part (not enough water circulation). In any case, within a week of setup, there were large colonies growing 1-2" below the water surface consisting of very small, barely visible whitish organisms that were self-motile. I know very little about aquatic biology and don't have a microscope at home, so I wasn't able to ID them. Perhaps these were daphnia?

    My main concern is with regard to question 1. If plain-old pondwater is unlikely to contain bugs that are a serious threat to my plants, then there's no need for question 2 (isolation).

    Again, thanks for the good tips and link.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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    7santiago's Avatar
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    I HATE ALGEA [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/mad.gif[/img] !!!

    so i grow my utrics in fish tanks with fish [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]

    ok heres a list of neat animals you can introduce to your aquatic utrics

    aquatic snails, just one fresh water snail. per 1-5 gallons

    and if you grow your utrics together or have A MONSTER SIZED utric you can add fresh water aglea eating fish they are extreamly efficiant at eliminating algea
    warning!! get one fish for every 10-20 gallons

    and if you can find fresh water mullosks( clams mussles ect.)
    they eat free floating algea and filter water.
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  5. #13
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    wouldn't the snails eat the utrics?

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    7santiago's Avatar
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    land snails eat vegetation but aquatic snails dont, they eat algea that forms on rocks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]What are the odds of cultivating organisms that EAT or are harmful to the aquatics if the water is from a pond that doesn't have aquatics growing in it? Have you run into this problem before?
    I haven't [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]2. Are daphnia visible to the naked eye?
    There are a bunch of species, but most are, at least if you have good vision. the biggest ones I've seen are about the size of the O. the smallest are smaller than the period at the end of this sentence.
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]In any case, within a week of setup, there were large colonies growing 1-2" below the water surface consisting of very small, barely visible whitish organisms that were self-motile
    mold problem eh? did they actually SWIM? or could they just move? were they roundish little specks that glided aong the water or were they longer-looking? Daphnia many times swim with a jerky motion (many times, not all the time though). Ostracods swim very smoothly and most are seed shaped (rounded), and paramecium are longer-looking and also swim very smoothly. I was actually quite shocked they're visible to the naked eye since they're single cells.... or they could have also been copepods, which are torpeedo shaped and swim in a more jerky motion than daphnia.
    since you said it was a mold problem, I'm guessing they were paramecium.
    ostracod picture
    copepod picture (with eggs)
    paramecium picture
    and I guess you've seen daphnia pictures already.
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]ok heres a list of neat animals you can introduce to your aquatic utrics
    You can also add tadpoles! lol. I found a bunch of eggs, I put three in my utric container (the rest died [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/mad.gif[/img]) and they're eating the algae and other stuff.
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]and if you can find fresh water mullosks( clams mussles ect.)
    they eat free floating algea and filter water.
    I really doubt that's a good idea. They like running water, and they need a lot of food. You'd have to be FEEDING the clams/mussels because unless you have a huge container (in relation to it's body size) it would filter out the water in no time.
    And I like free swimming algae. They've never caused a problem with me, and are food of the daphnia. The only algae I've had problems with is the one that attaches to the utrics and smothers them.
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  8. #16
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Thanks, guys, for the helpful replies.

    I can't quite remember the manner in which the microfauna were swimming. Irregardless, it seems to me (based on what's been said) that most of those tiny things are harmless to the aquatic CPs, so I'll just try culturing pond water and be satisfied with whatever grows. As long as it's not water mold or sessile algae--and I know what those look like!

    As for larger animals, I might try a freshwater snail. If you don't mind, two questions about these:

    1. The containers the aquatics are growing in have no lids. Will the snails know enough not to wander out of the containers and into my apartment (where they would become lost and most certainly die)?

    2. Can they survive on anything other than algae (dead matter such as sphagnum moss and the like)? Fortunately, I'm growing these plants indoors under lights which reduces algal growth, as does the acidic peat water. So, I don't currently have much algae but would still like to get the snails as a "prophylaxis" for potential algal blooms. Is this wise?

    Well, thanks again for the help.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
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