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Thread: Mutant fly traps

  1. #1
    Lord Humungus's Avatar
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    Can someone tell me what is up with this Red Dragon? There some other questionable traps but that one is the worst.
    I'm still living off the corpse of the old world.

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    Looks like an -extreme- case of Fused Tooth.

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    nepenthes_ak's Avatar
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    I think it would be neat if ALL VFT's looked some what like that! I dont think its that bad though, but yea a case of fused tooth.

    lol Cheers

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    Can we see a close up pic?

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    Strictly speaking it's deformed, not a mutant
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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    Well, it depends. It's possible that the cell giving rise to that leaf developed a mutation. Mutations can happen in body tissues as well as germ-line cells. When it happens in vertebrates, it usually causes cancer, but plants are very genetically resilent. However, it's also possible that exposure to some sort of environmental factor (a chemical in a bug it ate, heat, who knows what) disrupted normal development without any genetic changes.

    If you try to asexually propagate from that leaf, you should be able to tell; if buds from that leaf have the same traps, it's genetic, if not, a deformity.

    Mokele
    \"With malleus aforethought, mammals got an earful of their ancestor's jaw.\"
    --J. Burns, on the evolution of auditory ossicles.

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    I've never seen a VFT mutate once mature though. Plenty of deformed traps can occur and I had a typical which grew shortened teeth for 10 months before resorting to normality. A genetic clone such as Red Dragon is also highly unlikely to mutate.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I've never seen a VFT mutate once mature though.
    Well, for an entire trap to be affected by a mutation would require just the right mutation in just the right cell at just the right time. Not probable, but technically possible. Most mutations are never expressed in any visible form, and will die with whatever leaf the mutant cell is in.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Plenty of deformed traps can occur and I had a typical which grew shortened teeth for 10 months before resorting to normality.
    Which, I agree, is probably a deformity due to outside environmental influences.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]A genetic clone such as Red Dragon is also highly unlikely to mutate.
    Um, the mutation rate will be the same, regardless of the plant's ancestry as sexual or asexual; it's purely a chemical reaction in the DNA, and the sort of 'genetic signature' cloning would leave is unlikely to substantially affect mutation rate. Cultivar or not, two adjacent thymines plus a bit of UV equals a pyrimidine dimer which, if not fixed by photolyase, will lead to mutation. Where those two thymines are located and the content of the surrounding code is irrelevant. Unless there's something *really* special about flytrap genetics, the mutation rate will be constant across plants, cloned or not.

    Mokele
    \"With malleus aforethought, mammals got an earful of their ancestor's jaw.\"
    --J. Burns, on the evolution of auditory ossicles.

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