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Thread: Akai Ryu's not as strong?

  1. #9
    SpyCspider's Avatar
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    heheh perhaps I'm just not providing optimal conditions, but it's happened to me a couple of times now--both in a terrarium and outside. In terms of adjusting to a new environment, overcoming shock, even digesting prey, they just seem to be more delicate.

    Does anyone know if Red pirahnas or royal reds are more robust in general? What other red VFTs are out there? Thanks.

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    I have "Royal Red". It grows fine but not too robust. I can't seem to get longer cilia on my plant. I believe "Royal Red" is notible for its yellow margins, which I can't enjoy for long as full sun turns my plant's bands red. Other traits include very skinny leaves and mostly upright growth. Green Dragons on the other hand are uncontrollably vigorous, both in propagation and in leaf production.

    Here's a shot of "Royal Red" Notice the skinny leaves, arched mid rib, and yellow margins.


    Here's a shot of "Green Dragon" dwarfing a "Royal Red" plant.

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    SpyCspider's Avatar
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    ^wow, excuse my choice of words but that was pure HOTNESS. Very impressive.

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    Nice photos.

    My Royal Red is very robust and grows large traps on long leaves. After the low spring leaves, the long summer leaves start off held high and gradually lower over a few weeks.
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    SpyCspider's Avatar
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    yea, mine are starting to do that. It's very intriguing to see a rosette of low leaves and all of a sudden, a new one decides to adopt the tall slender version. I can't figure out how they "know" it's summer since the days haven't been getting hotter or longer in my opinion...but it has rained a lot recently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] Alvin Meister wrote:
    My Royal Red is very robust and grows large traps on long leaves.
    Yeah, mine is robust too, so that makes me wonder about my musings regarding anthocyanine (in red VFTs) and its (possible) diminishment of photosynthesis, elsewhere in this same thread. Most of my other red VFTs are slow growers, the Red Piranha and Clayton's Red Sunset for example, but none of my mostly-green VFTs are slow growers. I wonder why--

    I wonder if I gave my reds more intense or prolonged sun if their growth rate would catch up to the green VFTs, or whether they are just slow-growers for genetic reasons.
    Be happy in the travel--there is no destination

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    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    I'm not sure about the pigment theory. The problem is that the red pigment is an accessory pigment. The red pigments will protect the chlorophyll (as accessory pigments often do) but they will photosynthesize as well; they aren't there just to be colourful. Also, the chlorophyll is still there, doing its thing.
    Though, it is worthy to note that through propogation, we may simply be fostering and perpetuating a gene which is diminutive to photosynthesis (say, if the plant wasn't just creating the red pigment as an accessory, but that it we overburdening)- it's not impossible.
    It's easy to test the pigment theory though: if it is true that the red were overburdening/overprotecting, then we should see growth rate closer to the rate at which other non-red VFTs grow if we turn down the intensity of the light. This would cause the plant to produce less red, and thus free up the chlorophyll.

    My guess is that the red isn't blocking too much light or anything like that.

    In my experience, my red VFTs don't neccessarily grow slower/less robust, but when winter rolls around, they die back much harder (all the way back to the rhizome.)
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