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Thread: Dormancy

  1. #17

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    Alright thanks! ill do it ill keep them outside all winter, should i keep it in the plastic container it came in? and how often should i water it, it will Probably freeze the moss alot.

    And Copcarfc ill take you up on that offer, i hope my VFT's are ready for the winter! LOL
    \"Try not to shout, when in doubt.\"

  2. #18
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    It's OK if the moss, pot and plant freeze solid. It still wont kill the VFT. I would hold off on repotting until next year or while it's dormant. You should water it enough to keep it moist to the touch. Not soggy.
    My life sucks

  3. #19
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    [QUOTE=[b]Quote[/b] (scottychaos @ Oct. 03 2006,8:05)]
    Quote Originally Posted by CopcarFC,Oct. 02 2006,4:33

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I'm kind of in the same situation you are. I just recently put a VFT and a Sarr outside from a trade. They're both adjusting nicely but I wonder if they are healthy enough to go into dormancy. I might just bring them in for this winter ::shrug::.
    Outsider,
    your situation is totally different, because you live in Ohio..
    winters in Ohio are VERY different than winters in Texas!

    Have your plants been outside all summer and into this autumn? (before you got them?) if so, you could try the fridge..but dont just "bring them inside" into a warm house..
    70 degrees all winter is just as deadly as 20 below zero..
    Do you have anywhere cool they could spend the winter?
    basement? unheated room?
    Do you know the history of the plants before you got them in a trade? have they been dormant every winter before you got them? if so, they will need a propery dormancy this winter too..

    Scot
    Hey Scott,

    That's just the thing I'm not sure on the histories of the plants. They've only been outside since end of September.

    The way I over wintered my collection last year was putting them in an unheated garage. It worked very well. I only lost 1 sundew, everything else came back thriving. So I will be using the same method. I never forced them into dormancy. Infact I let them experience 1 snow. From what I understand the plant won't actually release the chemicals to go into dormancy and survive the dormancy until it experiences a freeze over. It just can't take the constant freezing/unfreezing.

    My question is, how can you determine the health of a plant and if it is healthy enough to go into dormancy? The traps are colored up nice, the sarr hybrid has green foilage but no new opened pitchers yet.
    James 1:17

    "Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows."

  4. #20
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Outsiders71 @ Oct. 03 2006,8:40)]Hey Scott,

    That's just the thing I'm not sure on the histories of the plants. They've only been outside since end of September.

    The way I over wintered my collection last year was putting them in an unheated garage.
    thats probably best for your new plants then..
    where did you get the new plants?
    was it a well-known CP nusery?
    or can you contact the person you got them from and ask where they have been growing all this season?

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] Infact I let them experience 1 snow. From what I understand the plant won't actually release the chemicals to go into dormancy and survive the dormancy until it experiences a freeze over.
    I doubt that is true...most plants begin the "going dormant" process when the light begins to diminish with the Summer Solstice in June! its a long, drawn-out process, lasting many months through late summer and into autumn.
    and many wild VFTs and Sarrs wouldnt even get a freeze or a snowfall until they are well into the dormancy period.

    giving them a light snowfall wont hurt, but it is also far from necessary IMO..

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]My question is, how can you determine the health of a plant and if it is healthy enough to go into dormancy? The traps are colored up nice, the sarr hybrid has green foilage but no new opened pitchers yet.
    If its been growing well all season, and its been outside all season, then its fine for dormancy..if grown outside, nature will take care of 99% of the "going dormant" process for you..you dont have to do a thing to help the plant along, other than find it a good winter home for a northern US winter.

    Im over in Rochester, NY..basically the same climate as Ohio.
    April-October is perfect weather for CPs outdoors.
    its just the winter months of November - March that are the killers..
    all you have to do is grow them outdoors April-October, by late October they will already be dormant all by themselves, then give them a winter of 35-55 degrees, instead of 20 below zero..

    I wouldt worry about trying to determine if they "look healthy enough"..because it doesnt really matter what they look like anyway..because no matter how they look, you should still put them into their winter resting place no matter what, because that is FAR more likely to ensure their survival than indoors on a warm 70 degree windowsill all winter!

    many people think "If I keep my VFT or Sarr indoors all winter, on the warm windowsill, it will be less likely to die than if I "risk" a dormancy.."
    the opposite is true..
    NOT risking dormancy is more likely to kill the plant than "risking" dormancy..

    Scot

  5. #21
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    If you'r worried about freezing, dig a hole in the ground, plop the pot into the hole and mulch. No big deal.

  6. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (JustLikeAPill @ Oct. 04 2006,5:46)]If you'r worried about freezing, dig a hole in the ground, plop the pot into the hole and mulch. No big deal.
    well..that depends on where you live.
    its "not a big deal" in Texas,
    but it could be a big deal in Ohio.

    IMO, digging a hole in Texas isnt necessary, because the plant will be fine not being in a hole.

    and IMO, digging a hole is too risky in Ohio..still too cold.
    might work, but there are better alternatives.

    Scot

  7. #23
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Then wait untill the first freeze and put it in the fridge, or put it in the garage /basement.

  8. #24
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I live an hour west of Scottychaos. I had my temperate CP's outside in minibogs last year, as I do this year. When the temps were forecasted to have overnight lows in the lower 30's I took toted them to the attic for the winter. I placed them at a SW window sill and watered them sparingly.... and waited winter out. I DID lose the 2 VFT's I had at the time, but attribute those losses to having been weak BEFORE I moved them. Every other species I had came back for me. Beginning in late February, one by one, first the D. filiformis, binata, rotundifolia, and intermedia. And the the Sarracenias and cobra lily. I used no fungicides. I just let the increasing photoperiod and waffling warmer temps determine when to break dormancy. I will do the same this year.

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