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Thread: Bacillus subtilis fungicides?

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    Question Bacillus subtilis fungicides?

    Hey all,

    I've come across a brand of fungicide recently that's supposed to be relatively safe for all sorts of things from veggies to ornamentals and fruits. The active ingredient is some strain of bacillus subtilis, which I've not seen or heard too much about. Says it even helps to control botyritis, which I found particularly encouraging. What I've read so far about this stuff sounds interesting, but I don't know of any specific mentions of it with regards to CPs.

    Has anyone tried this stuff with either positive or negative results?

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    Ive used it for about 2 years... along with trichoderma

    and also:

    B. licheniformis
    B. megaterium
    B. pumulis

    I'm a believer, especially with the trichoderma...

    Av

    http://ampacbiotech.net/

    http://generalhydroponics.com/genhyd...ubculture.html

    Texas A&M reference to using corn meal to encourage trich growth
    Last edited by Av8tor1; 02-09-2007 at 09:01 PM. Reason: add urls

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    Just the two of us eh? I guess I'll have to experiment on some of the more expendable 'typicals' in my collection.


    Thanks for providing your insight, I will look into the other products you mentioned.

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    All my experience in B. subtilis comes from genetic tinkering with them. Never heard anything about them being anti-fungal but I know they are probiotic so that probably goes hand in hand. B. subtilis does have a number of cool antimicrobials that it produces (I study one: Skf)

    Gonna have to do some pubmed searching...
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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    Bacillus subtilis has a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium shown to synthesize antifungal peptides. This ability has lead to the use of B. subtilis in biocontrol. B. subtilis has been shown to increase crop yields, although it has not been shown whether this is because it enhances plant growth, or inhibits disease growth.

    From MicrobeWiki

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Well MicrobeWiki could use a little help. Bacillus is not a rhizobacterium nor does it harbor rhizobacterium. It is a soil-dwelling endospore-forming bacterium and does not have an obligate association with plants.

    Did a quick search on PubMed and got a number of hits.

    The principle one was this:

    Leifert C, Li H, Chidburee S, Hampson S, Workman S, Sigee D, Epton HA, Harbour A.
    Department of Plant and Soil Science, University of Aberdeen, UK.

    Bacillus subtilis CL27 and B. pumilus CL45 showed similar activity against Botrytis cinerea in in vitro plate assays. In a seedling bioassay, however, B. subtilis CL27 had activity similar to a commercial fungicide while B. pumilus CL45 failed completely to prevent seedling damping-off caused by Bot. cinerea. Antibiotic production by the two Bacillus strains was found to depend on the growth substrate and highest antibiotic production was found on media based on homogenized cabbage tissue. Antibiotic activity was found to depend on the pH and nutrient concentration in the assay medium. Antifungal antibiotics produced by B. subtilis CL27 and B. pumilus CL45 in different fermentation media were separated by thin layer chromatography. As suspected from the activity spectrum, three antibiotics (one with activity against Alternaria brassicicola, one with activity against Botrytis cinerea and one with activity against both fungi) could be detected in the fermentation broth of CL27, but only one in the fermentation broth of CL45. The two antibiotics produced by strain CL27 with activity against A. brassicicola were identified as peptides since their bands on the TLC plates developed a green to blue/green colour after treatment with 4,4'-tetramethyldiamino-diphenylmethane (TDM) reagent. The third antibiotics produced by strain CL27 and antibiotic produced by CL45 had a similar Rf-value and appeared not to be peptides based on the reaction with TDM. However, they showed a slightly different activity spectrum when tested against a range of different fungi. Antibiotic production was clearly indicated as the mode of action of in vivo biocontrol by strain CL27 against damping off caused by Bot. cinerea of Astilbe micro-plants, because a u.v.-induced antibiotic negative mutant strain CL27b showed no activity in seedling bioassays in vivo. Also the mutant strain CL27a which produced the two peptide antibiotics but had lost the ability to produce the non-peptide antibiotic, showed greatly reduced in vivo activity.
    Also found references to other fungicides that it produses like fengycin and iturin A.

    Might have to take one of the prototroph strains home and innoculate my collection...
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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    you're way outta my league pyro

    Ive been told that while it is effective against botrytis, it doesnt harm or antagonize (sp?) the trichoderma... does that sound right to you?


    Cheers'
    AV

    have you read the story behind it? (WWII Germany... pretty interesting if it's accurate)

    edit: (I've noticed It does seem to cause any decaying plant material to take on an odd black color)
    Last edited by Av8tor1; 02-12-2007 at 08:45 AM. Reason: add comment

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    It just happens to be the organism I study so it is real familiar to me I am sure there are pleanty of things you have a greater knowlegde of than I do

    It does seem that the antifungals are pretty specific, they seem to go after detrimental fungi in any case. I have not gone looking for details though and it is always possible that the antifungals produced are pretty generic. Without any actual data I would tentatively suspect that the activity is specific but without actually plating out a competative assy it would remain nothing more than a guess. And I don't have any trichoderma here to test with (nor do I really have the freedom to go making unrelated assays...)

    I have not read the particular story about this but would be interested if you have the link.

    The only old school study I really know of is the one with B. subtilis in light bulbs in the subway tunnles. Anti-science jerks like to cite that one as proof that scientists are unethical and without morals. Since the purpose of that study was to test distribution of anthrax through the tunnles in the even of a bioattack I would say that using the probiotic subtilis instead of pathogenic anthrasis was the epitome of ethical and moral.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

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    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

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