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Thread: Dishing the Dirt on CP Soils

  1. #9
    Kinabalufan's Avatar
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    Great article.
    Who actually wrote it?
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    My Webpage with photos I took On Mt Kinabalu

  2. #10
    Katherine
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    Me!!!! Wholly me. I wrote, composed and edited every last scrap for you guys! Hope you enjoyed...
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    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    I agree. This is a very helpful guide.

    So what do you think can get waterlogged more easily, peat or sphagnum moss? You only mention waterlogging with sphagnum.

    The reason I ask is because I could not find perlite anywhere within the last couple of weeks and I had to go on ahead with my repotting. I had to choose between using either pure peat or pure sphagnum without perlite or any other aggregate as my growing medium. ...I went with using only pure peat.
    I find dry peat becomes full saturated overnight really.

    Either moss or peat is fine. I know someone with a fine collection all potted in 100% peat.

  4. #12
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kath View Post
    Sphagnum moss. Peat can take several weeks to fully become saturated, and dry sphagnum moss can hold up to 20 times it own weight in water!
    I just take the peat and knead it, like bread dough. Takes a few minutes to become saturated. Same with dried LFS. And then I rinse it through a spaghetti collander.

  5. #13
    Katherine
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    Mmm... but it takes a long time for all the pores of the peat to fully soak up its full potential of water, it looks like it's saturated, and for carnivorous plants it probably hold enough water, and yes, if you knead it it gets wetter faster, but if you just pour water on sphagnum moss it soaks it up it's full potential itself, peat will not do this on it's own.
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  6. #14

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    Good descriptions, kath. I agree with everything except for the use of the term "abrasive" to describe some of the aggregates, such as pumice, silica sand, and lava rock. It is true that they have sharp edges, and they would be abrasive if they moved. However, since they are stationary they cannot scrape or scratch. As evidence, I have found roots stuck to lava rock without any harmful results. The rest of the information about soils and aggregates is very useful.

  7. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    This LFS came from the dried material, months down the road. It was soaked, rinsed, and kneaded first.


  8. #16
    Katherine
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    Thank you for the comment! They are abrasive when being moved, and it is a useful thing to know, because there are quite alot of CP growers who must move their plants, or ship and send lots of plants, and in this cases 'abrasive' aggregates could possibly be harmful. It's better for people to know, then to wonder why their plants roots are all smashed up if they use 'miracle pumice' but don't know it's con's as well. And of course, if there is any possibility of it being abrasive to the roots at all, it must be listed as a con
    Drosera Arcturi-The Alpine Sundew...

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