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Thread: Some Sort of Bug is Eating My Venus Flytraps Insead of Vice Versa!

  1. #17
    Capensis Killer upper's Avatar
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    record your camera on it overnight, kinda like those security camera. see if anything comes.

  2. #18
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Bugs don't eat plants. Don't be absurd!

    In all seriousness, I'm not sure what this could be. I've thankfully only had a few of the more common pests in my collection. Slugs, perhaps? Judging by the deformations to that one petiole, it looks like a chewing bug and not a sucking one. If it is a bug at all. Is it possible your plant is stressed? The rest of the foliage looks very healthy; it could be that these few leaves were developing when something strange happened and they became malformed as a result.
    Best luck,
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  3. #19
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    I would treat the plants with a systemic and BT or BT and Spinosad (just found out about this one).

    WikiPedia on Spinosad
    Pesticide Database Entry

    These will take care of many chewing insect larvae or mite including thrips. BT (specifically BTi) will get rid of the fungus gnat larvae.

    These pesticides will not take care of snails or slugs - you just have to keep on the look out for them or their slime trails. Note: Bad infestations of fungus gnat larvae leave slime trials on the surface of your potting medium that look like snail tracks.

  4. #20
    Alien1099's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    I would treat the plants with a systemic and BT or BT and Spinosad (just found out about this one).

    WikiPedia on Spinosad
    Pesticide Database Entry

    These will take care of many chewing insect larvae or mite including thrips. BT (specifically BTi) will get rid of the fungus gnat larvae.

    These pesticides will not take care of snails or slugs - you just have to keep on the look out for them or their slime trails. Note: Bad infestations of fungus gnat larvae leave slime trials on the surface of your potting medium that look like snail tracks.
    Thanks Not a Number. I'll check those out. I checked my plants several times last night with a flashlight after I turned off the lights and never did see anything. I'm guessing it's not a snail or slug infestation since I don't see any slime tracks anywhere.

    Edit:
    I picked up the Spinosad but forgot the BT. Gotta go back!

    Edit:
    Hosed my plants down with the diluted BT and Spinosad solution using a spray bottle. Hopefully this signals the end of this unchecked aggression, because it WILL NOT STAND... MAN!

  5. #21
    italo.america's Avatar
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    It looks like ever since I've stopped bringing my plants outside during the the day, whatever was eating my VFTs has stopped. My VFTs are now growing inside and I have a question for the forum. Am I doing more harm than good by moving them from one room to another in-order for them to get more sunlight? Basically, I leave them in an Eastern facing window in the morning and then move them to a South facing window for the rest of the afternoon. I think I read somewhere that VFTs do not liked to be moved around and prefer to stay in one spot in-order to get acclimated to their growing environment?
    Thank you in advance for any useful information!

    Giovanni

  6. #22
    Carnivorous plant enthusiast vraev's Avatar
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    yeah! personally I would stay leave it at one spot. Not just VFT's....any plants resent movement as they need to first get used to their environment to thrive and grow properly.

  7. #23
    Alien1099's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vraev View Post
    yeah! personally I would stay leave it at one spot. Not just VFT's....any plants resent movement as they need to first get used to their environment to thrive and grow properly.
    Well the sun moves across the sky from one side to the other in a natural environment, so I doubt it would be a big deal honestly. I rotate mine every so often with no ill effects and used to take them outside periodically till something started eating them.

  8. #24
    I am diagonaly parked in a parallel universe Werdna's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear that something is eating your flytraps, I just had to chime in because of The Big Lebowski reference
    it WILL NOT STAND... MAN!
    I think I will go watch it now
    -Andrew II

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