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Thread: Bangkok Plant Market

  1. #9
    Alien1099's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by upper View Post
    put it in a plastic bag and swallow it, when you get back, get it out and there ya go.
    jk... dont do that... please...
    but cant you just say its a plant i got from the market, and put it in a box or something?
    No. People "releasing" specimens is how you get invasive species.

  2. #10
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/cl..._prod_inus.xml

    All travelers entering the United States are required to DECLARE any meats, fruits, vegetables, plants, seeds, animals, and plant and animal products (including soup or soup products) they may be carrying. The declaration must cover all items carried in checked baggage, carry-on luggage, or in a vehicle.

    Upon examination of plants, animal products, and associated items, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists at the ports of entry will determine if these items meet the entry requirements of the United States.


    Even though an item may be listed as “permitted” from a particular country, it is always best to DECLARE the item by checking “Yes” on Question 11 of the CBP Declaration Form 6059B. Also declare if you have been on a farm or in close proximity of livestock, as an agriculture specialist may need to check your shoes or luggage for traces of soil that could harbor foreign animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth.

    Avoid Fines and Delays
    Prohibited items that are not declared by passengers are confiscated and disposed of by CBP agriculture specialists. But that’s not all. Civil penalties may be assessed for violations and may range up to $1,000 for a first-time offense. Depending on whether the confiscated, undeclared items are intentionally concealed, or determined to be for commercial use, civil penalties may be assessed as high as $50,000 for individuals. The same fines apply to prohibited agricultural products sent through the international mail.
    Just declare them and let the Agriculture people inspect them. If any are CITES species and you don't have paper work to show they were grown from Tissue Culture or otherwise legally propagated they'll probably be confiscated. There should be no fine since you declared them and allowed inspection. Otherwise see the last paragraph quoted above.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  3. #11
    A yellow M&M Jefforever's Avatar
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    Those look like N. Globosa to me! They are much more valuable than Raffs.

    Maybe they're even seed grown!

  4. #12
    D_muscipula's Avatar
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    If you want to import them potted complete PPQ Form 525, without or without soil please complete PPQ Form 621 and PPQ Form 587. Permits cost 70$.
    view my growlist
    http://grwlist.notlong.com

  5. #13
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    If the leaves are serrated, then they are N. mirabilis. From what I can make out from the pic below, the middle two could be otherwise.

    But bear in mind that in Thailand, any Nep seedling could be a N. globusa hybrid.

    Cindy

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    ZeRoKooL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jefforever View Post
    Those look like N. Globosa to me! They are much more valuable than Raffs.

    Maybe they're even seed grown!
    Yup, the humble vendor told us that he cultivated and grew these from seeds.

    If you want to import them potted complete PPQ Form 525, without or without soil please complete PPQ Form 621 and PPQ Form 587. Permits cost 70$.
    Well, I'm not familiar with these forms and the process. Is the permit for the bunch of plants I'm planning to bring back, or per plant? Could you somehow lead me into the right direction D_Muscipula? I was also just wondering, I really can't just put them in a box, stamp my address and send it to the states?

    If the leaves are serrated, then they are N. mirabilis. From what I can make out from the pic below, the middle two could be otherwise.

    But bear in mind that in Thailand, any Nep seedling could be a N. globusa hybrid.
    Ok, so the green ones are either N. mirabilis or N. Globosa, and the ones in the middle are unknown? Cool.

    Since I can't read Thai, I can't really find mineral free, RO/distilled water so I purchased water for cars. My girlfriend asked the employee, and they said its mineral free and its used for cars. I was wondering if it is safe to use this water on CP's?
    Thanks guys, I really appreciate your time and help!

  7. #15
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    That water should be ok, if it is really the water they use for cars

    And by the way, those plants look very wel!

  8. #16
    ZeRoKooL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by celox View Post
    That water should be ok, if it is really the water they use for cars

    And by the way, those plants look very wel!
    Thanks Celox! I just watered my neps and filled the pitchers a little bit. I hope the condition of these plants continue to grow and stay healthy. I worry because am not very experienced with Nepenthes and Drosera. I'm trying my best to understand the basics. ^^

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