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Thread: Insecticide Question

  1. #9
    BigBella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adymitruk View Post
    I can't seem to locate Orthenex in the stores here (I'm in Canada).

    Has anyone used the "Fungus Gnat Spray" made by Wilson? The active ingredients are: Resmethrin 0.25%, Tetramethrin 0.25%...

    Thanks!
    How's it goin', eh? Resmethrin @ 0.25% is also in Orthenex, along with another charmer, Triforine @ 0.100%. The stuff you have on hand should do the trick. Systemic is the way to go -- burn everything, salt their fields . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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    I'm just hoping it leaves no mineral-like deposit on the roots...

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    BigBella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adymitruk View Post
    I'm just hoping it leaves no mineral-like deposit on the roots...
    There are no minerals to leave on the roots; it's simply a systemic insecticide which will control pests for months at a time. I have used Orthenex (which has the same chief ingredient as the Canadian brand) on Dionaea, Cephalotus, Nepenthes, Heliamphora, Sarracenia -- most everything that I can recall -- without any ill effects (2007 was a bad year for aphids). Drosera, according to some growers, may be another issue.

    If you are concerned about accumulation in the pot, spray the plants and then flush the pots with fresh water . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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    I can see the tiny (REALLY tiny) black round mites come out onto the leaves when the sun starts to get low in the sky. My thinking is that these little guys feed on the roots or a fungus that may be growing down there. This was a bad super-market rescue where the plants were on their last legs. They have made a good recovery but there are occasional deformed traps coming up (like a trap with one half of the leaf smaller than the other and brown spots on a leaf). The infestation started in the store, I'm sure. And I stupidly repotted the whole tiny pot's contents into a bigger pot with new mix to make up for the extra space.

    So the question is, should I bother applying the pesticide to the actual leaves or just do the top of the media?

    Thanks for your help so far!

  5. #13
    SirKristoff's Avatar
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    little black mites? are you sure? ive seen springtails that look like mites. if they drop or hop when you go to touch em, they are springtails and harmless. if they are mites, my guess would be a soil mite of some kind that eats dead or decaying plant matter as the usual and most common mite to infest plants are spider mites.

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    They are round and very tiny. Black or very dark brown. I'm hoping that's what it is. But given the problems that this plant has, if the spray also is a fungiside, I'd like to take the precaution...

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Are you certain they are mites and not springtails?

    Mites have 8 legs. Springtails have six. You need a good magnifier 10-20x to ID them.

    Springtails eat decaying matter and it's a waste of time trying to kill them with insecticides as they'll just be back in a couple weeks unless you so poison the medium that nothing will live in it.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    not a springtail (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springtail)

    very round, too small to see the number of legs.

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