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Thread: Will it be possible to adapt a Venus Fly trap to live year round?

  1. #9
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahmad View Post
    Well, it would be nice to have a "tropical" venus fly trap that grows year round with no dormancy.
    Im glad my plants go dormant!
    I appreciate the break during the winter months..

    If I had to maintain my VFTs and Sarrs all year, I probably wouldn't bother to grow them.

    not that they are super high maintance..
    its just that I have "summer hobbies" (CP's, Bonsai, other gardening and landscaping projects)
    and "winter hobbies"..(model railroading and catching up on reading!
    that I dont have time to do all summer..

    So im very grateful for winter dormancy!..I dont have to think about my CPs at all for four months every year..its nice.

    Scot

  2. #10
    Kayota's Avatar
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    I probably don't have as many CPs as you so I can't say I agree :P

  3. #11
    Gardening freak! tommyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahmad View Post
    Do you think it would ever be possible to adapt a Venus Fly Trap to live year round? For example, someone grows a Venus Fly trap and year after year shortens the dormancy to a point where they can be grown year round.

    Would this be possible? If so, think about how well they would sell

    No. IMHO, not possible.

    Corrections welcomed.
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  4. #12
    Capensis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottychaos View Post
    Im glad my plants go dormant!
    I appreciate the break during the winter months..

    If I had to maintain my VFTs and Sarrs all year, I probably wouldn't bother to grow them.


    Scot
    So very true.
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  5. #13
    italo.america's Avatar
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    No Dormancy!

    My water bill would be out the door! Even with an R.O. unit.

    Giovanni

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    Katherine
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    It would take a lot of selective breeding - not to mention you're getting rid of one of VFt's natural features!
    Drosera Arcturi-The Alpine Sundew...

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  7. #15
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Well..in theory there is one simple way to adapt a VFT to growing year-round and not require a dormancy..it happens all the time in nature..millions of species of plants have adapted to no dormancy!

    All you do is build an artificial bog in South Carolina..stock it with VFTs..
    then, very gradually, over the course of a few million years, slowly move it south toward the equator..
    an inch a year should do it..

    that would probably work! (seriously..not being sarcastic)

    but other than that..no, it wont work..

    Scot

    p.s.
    I worked out the actual distance!
    South Carolina to the equator is about 3,500 miles..
    thats 22,176,000 inches. (22 billion)

    lets say you would need 2 million years to actually adapt a plant to a new climate..
    (I doubt one million would be long enough)

    doing the math..thats 9 inches a year..(assuming my math is right!)
    you would need to move the plants 9 inches a year southward to reach the equator in 2 million years.

    thats only a little faster than Continental drift, and Continental drift alone is responsible for creating all kinds of new species,
    and adapting existing species to new climates..so yeah, it would totally work.

    you might have a new species of VFT by the time you get there!
    but that could be interesting..

    Scot

  8. #16
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    It would be way quicker then to let it go dorment every year. I have things to do in my 2 million years time.

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