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Thread: Genetics of root division putting up flowers

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    Gamer Ridetsu's Avatar
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    Genetics of root division putting up flowers

    So, this year I really want to try and successfully flower and seed my VFT. I currently have 3 that are putting up stalks, but upon thinking about which ones are flowering, I have come to the conclusion that they have been root divisions (essentially clones) of the same plant. So, technically, there should be no genetic variation if its the exact same plant, right? (except if there's a radical mutation)

    So, here's some questions
    If I mate these clones, will I see the negative aspects of inbreeding, like mass deformities or huge mutations?
    Since it is a clone, does that mean the pollen won't be accepted because it would technically see it as its own pollen? Since there's no genetic difference between the two plants (that I can tell since they're clones... but maybe my VFT clone science is not correct?) wouldn't it just reject the pollen from the other plant?
    Are these plants able to self pollinate in the sense that they can use their own genetic material on the seeds?


    I enjoy science and such, but these questions baffle me. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    ~The Fallen and Forgotten~

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    SirKristoff's Avatar
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    No you shouldnt see any signs of inbreeding at all....You might get a few week plants, but you should also get some strong plants too. The only thing you wont see much of is diversity in them.....

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    Plants seem to be the exception to the in-breeding. Though everything naturally prefers genetic variations plant will just produce less seeds if self pollinated and fertilized. A cross would just yield more viable seeds. The seeds which do develop though will be normal unless of course there is that one mutated which can happen just as well in a cross between two genetically different organisms. You wont have any plants with problems like you would in humans or other non-plant organisms such as Downs syndrome etc...
    Essentially you're taking 2 flowers from 2 plants that are genetically identical. You would get the same results (theoretically) if you self pollinated 1 flower from 1 plant. If like you said there is drastic mutation then you will get more viable seeds. Plants are great at crossing themselves and with each other, so much so that they can even cross with plants that have different chromosome ploidy (numbers). A great example of this is orchids!

    Good luck with your pollination, i'm doing the exact same thing this year, 2 plants, genetically identical and crossing them. Hope you get lots of seeds!

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    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridetsu View Post
    So, technically, there should be no genetic variation if its the exact same plant, right?
    The offspring will not all be identical, if that is what you are inferring. There will still be some diversity in the offspring.

    xvart.
    "The tragedy of life is not that every man loses; but that he almost wins."

    "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?"

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