User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 17

Thread: Making the move outside

  1. #1
    twigs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    100
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Making the move outside

    Here's the deal. After my VFT came out of dormancy, I had set it outside (it had been in the garage). It was doing ok for a bit, but quickly turned terrible (don't ask, I think it got watered with tap water or something). I brought it inside and ended up putting it in a makeshift terrarium. It has been doing much better in the terrarium, it has a lot of new growth, and I am moving it outside.

    I put it in a window planter that will house a few other VFTs (currently in the mail), but I'm worried about my plant accumulating.

    I planted it in a 50/50 mixture of peat moss/perlite, and watered it pretty good. Then I took a gallon plastic bag and put it over the plant to increase humidity. The bag is pretty well sealed around the part of the planter with the plant in it, but its going to be a huge leap from terrarium conditions to my setup now.

    Also, I've had it under an Intelligent Plant Light up until now, but its going to be getting a LOT more sun. Should I shade it to prevent it from burning? Remember its almost all new growth.

    Could anyone provide me some tips on making this easier on the plant?

  2. #2
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    ARTificial Bog in da' Middle of da' USA
    Posts
    932
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,
    Yes by all means make the transition slow and gentle.
    We do that with all plants... as especially to go from low or artificial lighting to
    full sunlight, will sun burn and cook your plant and surely kill it!

    A week in semi shade and another in partial sun (morning or late day sun) will help to
    acclimate the plant. More time is up to you, but I would do no less than a week myself.

    Do keep in mind that in addition to the UV/IR rays of the sun, the plant is also trying to
    deal with different temps, humidity and watering....
    Therefore any condition change you can control and make less dramatic (like the amount of sun and the time of day it gets it, as midday sun is a scorcher!) will help the plant.
    Remember, now is the time it needs you and your attention the most!

    Good luck!
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

  3. #3
    CB1099's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Wickliffe, Ohio
    Posts
    27
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You probably already know this, but don't leave it in the bag once you put it outside. That will surely cook the plant. You may even consider slowly taking it out of the bag while its still under the grow lights to help acclimate it to lower humidity.

  4. #4
    scottychaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western New York, USA
    Posts
    2,970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sounds like you are doing things right..

    a few thoughts..
    personally I see no need whatsoever for the perlite..I dont even understand why anyone would use it at all for VFTs or Sarrs..all it does is displace the peat, leaving less peat in the mix, which equals less water retention, which IMO is a bad thing..can anyone give me a logical reason/benefit for using perlite?

    the perlite probably doesnt hurt..its fine leaving it there..(I wouldnt repot the plant again!
    I just see no benefit to it..and it could possibly be a detriment..

    full sunlight, will sun burn
    yes it will..

    and cook your plant
    no it wont..

    and surely kill it!
    it surely will not kill it..

    IMO, the sunburn is unavoiadble, no matter how slowly you acclimate the plant..
    IMO, its better to just stick the plant right out in the full sun..
    new leaves, as they emerge, will be acclimated to full sun and will not burn..
    the old leaves, that grew indoors or in a terrarium, will burn..but there is nothing that can be done about that..the burn is a small price to pay for the far greater benefit of getting the plant in the full sun where it belongs..

    I guess there is nothing wrong with "acclimating slowly"..especially for a plant that is known to be weak to begin with..but IMO I see no real benefit to it either..The leaves will burn anyway..so what difference does it make if they burn today or a week from now? if you put the plant in full sun immediately, it can begin getting the "proper medicine" (full sunlight) immediately..which is what it needs..
    the full sun is a GOOD thing..not something to be afraid of or avoided..

    check out the "burn demo" for more info:
    http://gold.mylargescale.com/scottychaos/CP/page5a.html

    Scot

  5. #5
    Capensis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Everywhere. Capensis everywhere.
    Posts
    4,046
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree with Scotty, just throw the thing outside, it´ll acclimate. VFTs are very hardy. When I got my Wal-Mart VFT, I just put it outside. It got a little burned, but the leaves it made afterwards were perfectly healthy.
    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=6789&dateline=1352508752

  6. #6
    mmlr38's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Ashland, OR
    Posts
    555
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's not a bad idea to acclimate your plant to lower humidity and strong light levels. I would recommend doing it. Drastic changes in humidity and light levels can kill your plant. However, as many have stated, VFTs are pretty hardy and this isn't very likely.

    Quote Originally Posted by scottychaos View Post
    personally I see no need whatsoever for the perlite..I dont even understand why anyone would use it at all for VFTs or Sarrs..all it does is displace the peat, leaving less peat in the mix, which equals less water retention, which IMO is a bad thing..can anyone give me a logical reason/benefit for using perlite?
    A quote from Steve Doonan, a very experienced Dionaea grower: "Sand and perlite help to aerate the soil and keep it from becoming so waterlogged that rot is encouraged."

    Also, I have read reports of people plants dying from rot that were planted in pure peat moss. However, this hasn't been my experience. I use peat/perlite mixture that is heavy on the peat and it works well for me. Perhaps if you live in a wetter climate (I live in arid Boulder, CO) then rot would be more of an issue for you.

  7. #7
    BigBella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF, CA
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mine are thrown through "botanical boot camp" upon their arrival. I don't worry about any transitioning and anticipate that there will be some initial leaf-burning. Invariably, the newer growth will be unaffected and the plant will be far more robust and pest resistant.

    There are far greater concerns with problems associated with lowered light levels than the effects of full sun . . .

    In terms of composts, I have always preferred sphagnum peat and sand mixes over perlite (I just hate the stuff); but each to his own . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  8. #8
    scottychaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western New York, USA
    Posts
    2,970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mmlr38 View Post
    A quote from Steve Doonan, a very experienced Dionaea grower: "Sand and perlite help to aerate the soil and keep it from becoming so waterlogged that rot is encouraged."

    Also, I have read reports of people plants dying from rot that were planted in pure peat moss. However, this hasn't been my experience. I use peat/perlite mixture that is heavy on the peat and it works well for me. Perhaps if you live in a wetter climate (I live in arid Boulder, CO) then rot would be more of an issue for you.
    hmmm..maybe.
    but "CP pots" in general are usually very waterlogged anyway..
    I keep the water level of my minibogs only 3" below the surface..
    so if ithe media is 100% saturated anyway, I dont see the composition of the media making any difference..

    Perlite is probably beneficial for many plants, like general houseplants and Nepenthes, that *dont* constantly sit in water..in those cases, having a more open, airy mix is a benefit..
    but for bog plants.."open and airy" just doesnt apply..
    and actually, "open and airy' could in theory hurt..making the media too dry..

    lets say, just for the sake of the arguement, that you have two choices of media for your VFT..pure fine-grained sand, very dense, or orchid bark, very very "open and airy"..
    which would you choose?
    yes, of course the sand..
    even though the sand might be *too* dense, its still far better than the orchid bark..
    IMO, adding perlite to peat to make it more "open and airy" moves it ever so slightly toward the orchid bark end of the scale..and we dont want to go in that direction.

    I agree adding perlite makes the media more open and airy..
    my only point is..why do we want that for VFTs and Sarrs?
    IMO, we dont want or need that..

    many of my CPs have been in pure peat for 16 years now..no root rot yet!

    Im guessing (just my opinion!) that the use of perlite in the CP world is simply something that has carried over from the "regular houseplant" world..

    well..to each their own I suppose..if someone wants to use perlite in a VFT or Sarr mix, it probably wont hurt anything..but I think we also have a lot of evidence that its simply not necessary..

    ok..enough about perlite!

    Scot

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Big Move
    By Ozzy in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 12-24-2008, 08:16 AM
  2. Should I try to move them?
    By yaric in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-26-2008, 12:28 AM
  3. When to move?
    By Goofzilla in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-23-2006, 07:00 PM
  4. To move or not to move
    By kahnli in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-29-2005, 10:07 AM
  5. What kinds move
    By leftyman in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-11-2002, 10:01 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •