User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 24

Thread: Now for the snow question...

  1. #9
    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The issue there is probably dehydration rather than death by cold alone.

  2. #10
    Johnny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Pelham, NH
    Posts
    41
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cp-connection View Post
    I'm in zone 5 and single digit Fahrenheit temps freeze my bog garden solid. Frost heave pulls the VFT out of the ground and makes them dead. Just sayin!
    Sounds more like "hoar ice" rather than frost heaves and, that would surely kill VFT's. A good blanket of snow usually doesn't let that happen.

  3. #11
    Devon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,945
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by grumpus View Post
    Wow... I was just posting in the "when to bring them in?" thread that people underestimate how much cold VFTs can take, but this is hard to believe.

    Minus 30 C is -22 Fahrenheit, right?

    That's a good 30-40 F. degrees colder than it ever gets in the Wilmington area. And it only gets that cold briefly and rarely.

    It's really hard to believe VFTs could live outside all winter in temps even approaching that.
    well here in ottawa, VFT's cannot live outdoors year round. but in niagara I was told they can. there is a nice snow cover and the windters are around -20 celcius most of the time. I'm not sure if niagara is zone 5.

  4. #12
    cp-connection's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Western, NC
    Posts
    629
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny View Post
    Sounds more like "hoar ice" rather than frost heaves and, that would surely kill VFT's. A good blanket of snow usually doesn't let that happen.
    I had to look up hoar ice, its a synonym for frost. We usually don't have snow to insulate so what happens to my bog is frost heave (the water in the peat moss freezes and squirts out of the top in icicle form). Sarracenia are fine but anything with smaller roots gets pulled up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny View Post
    I'm in NH on the line of zones 5 and 6 and my VFT's stay out year round. They've been under about a foot of snow for a month now. They come every spring no worse for the wear. They are in the ground in bogs however. I might worry about them in pots up here, but not in zone 8. They should be just fine.
    I've overwintered VFT in pots outside unprotected in South Carolina zone 8. There were about 80 pots in all and most of them came back small and weak in the spring. There is an enormous difference between being in a pot and being in the ground with a toasty blanket of snow on top.

  5. #13
    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Helotes, Texas
    Posts
    933
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A lot of the discussion has been about being in the ground versus a pot. What about a very large 29 gallon mini bog contained? I know temperature does not fluctuate as much. CP connection, if we are going to have a low of 18 degrees followed by lows the next few days in the 20s, should I just leave the plants where they are or cover them with something?

    Phil

  6. #14
    cp-connection's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Western, NC
    Posts
    629
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Baylorguy View Post
    A lot of the discussion has been about being in the ground versus a pot. What about a very large 29 gallon mini bog contained? I know temperature does not fluctuate as much. CP connection, if we are going to have a low of 18 degrees followed by lows the next few days in the 20s, should I just leave the plants where they are or cover them with something?

    Phil
    I would protect it from wind if it were mine. If you're worried about it then get a bale of pine straw to put on top and around, then throw an old blanket over it.

  7. #15
    back2eight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    565
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The snow or the cold are not the problem. DEHYDRATION is the problem. When the soil is completely frozen, the plant cannot "drink". The winds leach all the moisture from the plant and it cannot replinish it through the roots because the water is frozen. I guarantee it, the cold is not what kills them per se. That is why mulching or covering during the worst freezes helps. It helps block the wind from the plant so it doesn't dehydrate so fast!

  8. #16
    scottychaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western New York, USA
    Posts
    2,970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I wouldnt trust Niagara..
    im in Rochester..same place..
    WAY too cold.

    Scot

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Snow!
    By jimscott in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-17-2009, 06:36 AM
  2. SNOW?!?!?!
    By Pyro in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-21-2008, 05:24 AM
  3. Snow????
    By Wesley in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-31-2006, 07:11 PM
  4. First snow!
    By pond boy in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 12-15-2003, 08:03 AM
  5. Snow....
    By nepenthes gracilis in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-29-2003, 01:28 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •