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Thread: VFT Growth Range

  1. #1
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    VFT Growth Range

    I have read that Worldwide, the Venus' fly-trap is only native within a 100-mile radius of Wilmington, N.C. As other CP's (Sarrs and Dews) range is a lot broader, and all these plants grow quite well experiencing identical conditions (as VFT's do) in many cultivated situations, does anyone have any theories as to why the range of VFT's natural growth has remained so small compared to that of other CP's?
    Is it thought to be a more recent species that hasn't had as much time to spread, or is there something about it's environment that prevents it from growing naturally in other areas? Seems to me that I have heard that plants introduced into other areas have done well, and if so then why has it not expanded its range as the Dews and Sarrs have?

    With winter approaching and there being a bit less to do "plant tending"-wise, these are the thoughts I begin to contemplate!

    I already know that growing them from seed sometimes requires the patience and dedication of a Centenarian, however I am interested in some unusual and typical VFT seed to work with, if anyone has a worthwhile quantity to trade, or otherwise. (PM me if you do.)

    Like many other CP's, it is sad to know that their habitat is so small and limited, and yet still being destroyed! If things continue as they are, it will be up to people like us to find a solution. And as has been suggested at times, that solution may lie beyond normal conservation efforts, protection, and preservation of a few small habitats, if the threatened species are to survive.
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

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    INFECTED Rball's Avatar
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    Thats too bad

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    There are fossil records of Dionaea pollen in Central Europe from about 14 million years ago. It's thought Dionaea's was very wide spread as with Aldrovanda. Aldrovanda and Dionaea are thought to have come from a common ancestor some 65 million years ago.

    http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/full/89/9/1503

    The Carolina coastal plains used to be frequently inundated with periodic flooding and earlier forms of DIonaea were probably semi-aquatic. As the coastal plains dried up probably only those plants better adapted to drier conditions survived.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  4. #4
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    Hey NaN,

    Made for an interesting read... thanks.
    I have seen where stands of plants introduced (in the 1930's!?) further south were growing strong and well established. With so many decent habitats in the neighboring states, it just seemed a bit strange to me how other plants were so widespread into these areas, while VFT's stayed where they were, so to speak.
    A lot of time has passed from when they began, and it would be interesting to know what actually occurred. Nature is indeed amazing in its behavior and abilities, and it is sometimes hard to predict what the future holds. (I think getting them to grow in normal soil would greatly help their chances of survival. Unlikely to happen however! )

    As a kid I remember an advertisement about VFT's, telling the tale of a comet landing in Wilmington N.C. millions of years ago, which had the strange "unearthly" life forms on it leading to VFT's growing only in that area and no where else! Nothing like truth in advertising!
    Actually it was a good story for kids and did answer why they grew in that area and no where else! Ridiculous, but cute!
    Perhaps not as reasonable as rising and falling water levels, continental drift, survival of the fittest and so-on, but a lot more intriguing!

    I am still not sure why the VFT didn't spread further over thousands of years, since reasonable habitats are rather close to "home" for it (unlike an N.Villosa which cannot spread further as the surrounding habitat is not conducive to its survival). Perhaps that comet theory is right after all!

    Thanks again for the input!
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

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    UnstuckinTime's Avatar
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    Just a thought- perhaps something to do with the topography of their native range? As I understand it, they are right on the coast (relatively) and while they could get flooded, the waters might push seed closer to the ocean, which can only survive so far before getting too salty. Any raise in sea level,(due to interglacial sea rise, not storm surges and the like) which would push the floating seed back, would get killed by the salt. Though, I suppose that would also kill the majority of the parent plants themselves, wouldnt it? So, they are perhaps effectively on an "island" of inhabitable conditions.... maybe.

    Im just pondering like GrowinOld over there!
    "The plants you grow, end up growing you."


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    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=123995

  6. #6
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    Hey,
    Good pondering!
    It's the start of figuring things out, even a mystery like this!

    Nature is amazing!
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

  7. #7
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    Yeah I would guess that maybe there is some geographical restrictions right around it's range that kept it from being widely prolific.

    It is a phenomena that occurs with carnivorous plants though... Some species don't have really broad ranges. When you think about it, there are actually only a handful that are really spread out across many continents.

    You think about Darlingtonia californica, it's much the same, very specialized, unlike any other pitcher plants yet it only grows along a relatively select little strip of northern California/southern Oregon.

    Or Cephalotus follicularis, it's range is not particularly large.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

  8. #8
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    Dex,

    My only thought was with the fact that VFT's seem to be able to grow elsewhere rather well (areas in other states where they were introduced grew like natives), as I mentioned, while other plants like Darlingtonia are in a specific environment (cold mountain streams and underground waterways) and cannot easily grow in surrounding areas. (Like ultra-highland Neps. are restricted by their narrow environmental needs.)
    In a lot of places (not all), if the dews and Sarrs can grow there, VFT's can survive also. Unlike Darlingtonia which seems to be more environment specific.
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

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