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Thread: Deep questions on propagations

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    Deep questions on propagations

    Hi I've used the method propagation using leaf pullings however I have read that there are the following:

    Firstly we have seeds ( Not all cultivars produce seeds)
    Secondly we have Offshoots ( These are the baby plants that are produced off the mother plant)
    Thirdly we have leaf cuttings ( I thought this was the full pull to the bottom inc rhizone)
    Fourthly rhizome cuttings ( Would like to know how this is really different from no 3)
    Then then I read Vegetative propagation only, surely this can be done in vitro also... so I don't fully understand why vegetative only?


    Any advise welcome please

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    clippity-clip-clip Clue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noddy View Post
    Firstly we have seeds ( Not all cultivars produce seeds)
    Secondly we have Offshoots ( These are the baby plants that are produced off the mother plant)
    Thirdly we have leaf cuttings ( I thought this was the full pull to the bottom inc rhizone)
    Fourthly rhizome cuttings ( Would like to know how this is really different from no 3)
    Then then I read Vegetative propagation only, surely this can be done in vitro also... so I don't fully understand why vegetative only?
    1. If we're talking about propagating cultivars, seed may not preserve the characteristics you're looking for.
    2. The "offshoot" method you describe sounds like division.
    3. Some growers call them "leaf cuttings", but any leaf "cutting" you take should have the white base intact, so the technique is usually referred to as a "leaf pulling".
    4. Dionaea rhizomes grow very densely, so a rhizome division would be exactly like technique #2 above.

    In-vitro propagation of Dionaea, if I am not mistaken, can be done vegetatively or with seeds.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clue View Post

    In-vitro propagation of Dionaea, if I am not mistaken, can be done vegetatively or with seeds.
    Micropropagation is possible with seed; developing leaves; flower stalks; and rhizomes. Dionaea is quite possibly the easiest plant to introduce in vitro . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

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