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Thread: A natural death...

  1. #1

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    How do you know if your flytrap is naturally dieing?(lets assume you'v had it for a bit)....

  2. #2

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    When you grow it outside and let it get bashed by rain... [img]http://www.**********.com/iBhtml/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] jk

    But what do you mean by naturally dying? Plants don't exactly just die from old age--there is a distinct cause e.g. fungus, pests, rain drops, etc.
    Chris

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    But they must naturally die at some point....and i just happen to grow my plant outdoors in totaly exposure to the elements because it will be very hardy that way and it will multiply through it's natural form of rhizome division every year as opposed to plants grown inside which won't live as long as plants cultured outside and won't divide as much....

  4. #4

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    If given (unnaturally) perfect conditions, perennial plants could keep on growing forever. Literally. But they are always killed off by something. Try not to think of them as people. Plants don't grow old and eventually weaken and die-- they just keep getting larger, tougher, and ever more resistant to being killed off.

    I was just teasing about the raindrops! [img]http://www.**********.com/iBhtml/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
    I can see your reasoning, but I'm still doubtful:
    Venus Flytraps in habitat aren't growing in pots, however. They're in peat dozens of feet deep and receive water through a balanced bog ecosystem that insures their survival and protects them from extremes of temperature and climate.
    True, plants grown outside will receive more light. They're also much less likely to be attacked by pests. What you seem to be suggesting is that totally exposing your plant to the elements will 'harden it off'. That doesn't translate to a healthier, more beautiful plant though.
    If you live in a climate where it is possible, I think by far the best way to grow your VFT would be in a deep artificial bog along with other flytraps. There, it would still benefit from the high light, but it would be much more protected from the elements.
    But it may be too warm where you live. In that case, I'd try a terrarium if you're opposed to windowsill growing it. [img]http://www.**********.com/iBhtml/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif[/img] But if what you're doing now is working just fine and you're satisfied with how it's growing...
    Chris


    (Edited by Dionaea Enthusiast at 7:18 pm on Feb. 26, 2002)

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