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Thread: Muscipula speciation

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Just curious - the Drosera genus has >130 species in it. Sarracenia, Nepenthes, and Pinguicula also have several. How is it that there is only Dionaea or for that matter, why only one Darlingtonia? Shouldn't there be something structurely close to it in a nearby location?

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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    there might be..eventually.
    perhaps Dionea is just too recent?
    new related species just havent appeared yet.
    perhaps its the only one *so far*..
    new related species will get here someday, if the habitat survives the short human era.
    thats my theory.

    Scot

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    Frakkin Toaster Cynic81's Avatar
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    Also, Darlingtonia may have more in common with sarracenia, IE it's very similar structurally to S. Psittacina. This leaves me wondering why it was given it's own species as opposed to being listed under Sarracenia. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif[/img]
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    I think I know this one. Because Darlingtonia has many more differences than is obvious. How many Sarrs do you know that make runners? Also, all Sarracenia can be hybridized. Darlingtonia's cannot be hybridized with Sarrs, making them a separate species. Just because their trapping mechanism is similar doesn't make them the same species. There are probably some other genetic differences, but I'm no scientist. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

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    It's been one of dem days BigCarnivourKid's Avatar
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    Isn't it also possible that there were several species of VFTs in the past but they all died out but for D. muscipula?
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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (BigCarnivourKid @ Dec. 22 2003,02:21)]Isn't it also possible that there were several species of VFTs in the past but they all died out but for D. muscipula?
    yes, I think that is likely too!
    that would also explain why the VFTs current range is so small..
    they might be in the last stages of a major (natural) decline! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img]

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    IceDragon's Avatar
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    Darlingtonia does not make enzymes and the flower is different from sars.

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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (scottychaos @ Dec. 22 2003,02:27)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (BigCarnivourKid @ Dec. 22 2003,02:21)]Isn't it also possible that there were several species of VFTs in the past but they all died out but for D. muscipula?
    yes, I think that is likely too!
    that would also explain why the VFTs current range is so small..
    they might be in the last stages of a major (natural) decline! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img]
    or..the range might not be in decline,
    but hasnt been able to spread because conditions arent right "outside" the current small range..
    but that doesnt seem likely, since VFTs can live in the southern Sarracenia range and conditions..hmmm..

    so either the native VFT range was once larger, and is now in decline..or the species is "just starting out" and hasent yet had the time and opportunity to spread out much..
    personally I think that is more likely..

    scot

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