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Thread: Dormancy

  1. #9

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    Fridge dormacy is not the best option if you have other choices, many people have lost plants through it including me. Even though you have fungicides and what not, the chances of infection is great. The main reason why many plants in the fridge die is because there is no air circulation going around causing stagnant air to stick around cause a fungal infection.
    53* is way cool enough for a plant to have it's dormacy. Leave the plant outside for dormacy and it'll come back alot healthier and more vigorous the next growin season since it can have photosynthysis, thus making energy stores for the winter time. There doesn't need to be as much light, just leave it in a area where there isn't too much shade and gets light.
    In the Fridge there is no light so no new energy is created making a weaker plant.
    I have tried to avoid the fridge method all to often due to plant death, but if you do try it because of the temperatures or something, leaving it in the pot would be better, so at least the plant can conentrate on growing it's root for next year. Bareroot doesn't allow for as good of root growth (This especially applies for many Sarracenias.

    For how long do temps in your area stay below 65*, if it is for at least two months then you should be fine.
    I thought you people where \"Plant Geeks\", Look at me Now...

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  2. #10
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    (12* C = 54* F) is NOT cool enough for dormancy!
    (and..will it *really* be 12C inside a house on a windowsill continously for 3 months? probably not..probably warmer.)
    and the fridge is an EXCELLENT way to do dormancy..
    I have done it every winter for the last 10 years..works absolutely fine..
    Peter, not sure where you are getting your info, but whoevere is telling you this stuff, you should stop listening to them!!

    ideally, VFT's should be between 35 and 45F (2-7 degrees C) all winter for dormancy..
    3 months minimum. there is no such thing as a "partial" dormancy..
    either the plant is truly dormant (NO growth)..or its just growing slowly..
    growing slowly does *not* equal "partially dormant"!

    Scot

  3. #11
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Average January low for Wilmington NC. -37F 3C
    http://www.navi-gator.com/wilmington...on/weather.htm

    and here is an excellent source for dormancy info..
    (keep clicking "ahead" at the bottom, there are several pages of info)

    http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq2460.html

  4. #12
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    VFT's can take the occasional light freezes. It DOES occur in their native North Carolina. Another thing to remember is that you want to gradually dcrease photoperiod and temperatures toward dormancy and then reverse the process in late winter. A plant should NOT be taken from a "room temperature" environment and shoved into another one 30 degrees colder - nor the reverse. Mine was on a window sill from June 'till early November. Then I put in between the inner and outer windows of our kitchen. I soon realized that it wasn't cold enough, particularly during sunny days, when it would experience "greenhouse effect." I then put it in a screened in back porch. That got it dormant, but a cold snap in December froze it temporarily. I then put it in the butter keeper of our fridge. I did NOT put it in a baggie or otherwise enclose / seal it, trying to give it some air circulation. In February I brought it back to my workplace and into the laboratory fridge for another couple weeks, before I put it back on the 50-ish window sill to wake up. A month later I put it outside, where it rewarded me, in spite of its frequent moves, with a flower stalk. There was no observable growth from mid-November through mid-February.

  5. #13

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    Hmmm... Scottychaos, I think I somewhat know what I am talking about. Here's the basic rule of thumb when talking about VFT dormacy as long as you get some of the major factors of dormacy down then you'll be fine.
    1- Temperature
    2- Lighting
    3- Air Circulation

    In Refrigeration, it only covers one of the three things, so that's why it isn't the best option. The outdoor method, you get 3 of the 3 down so you'll be off. Of course there are some factors that are more important then others, like Temperature is a must over the others, and the others can be missing, but the health or the chance of disease is increased greatly.
    Scottychaos, do your research before you post links...LOL
    The SAME link that you reffered me too says the same thing I said!
    Here's some information based on Barry Rice-
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Method 1: If you live in a place with a naturally chilly winter, you should consider letting your plant go through winter outside. A "chilly" winter is one where the daily highs are not much warmer than 24C (75F) and the night temperatures rarely (if ever) drop below 0C (32F). If you live in such a climate, keep the plant outside all winter. The plant will happily drowse itself through the winter, and will probably love it. The plant must stay moist, of course. It will want lots of sunlight because it will still be doing photosynthesis, although not quite as much. If you experience the occasional killing frost, protect the plant by bringing it indoors on those boreal nights.
    Hmmm.... 75*? and I said what? 65* to be on the safe side....

    Here's what he said about refrigeration method....
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Method 3: Put the plant in a sealed bag, and stick it in your refrigerator (not the freezer!). The plant will enter a deep dormancy in this very cold storage. Since it is in such a deep dormancy, it will not need sunlight---but the soil should be kept moist. In the spring, take the plant out of the refrigerator. I do not think this method works as well for Venus Flytraps as it works for some other carnivorous plants, but I get pretty good results doing it. Avoid repotting the plant to fit it into your refrigerator (fall repottings are bad for the quasi-dormant plant). But if you must, be very careful not to damage the plant or its roots.
    Notice this line - "I do not think this method works as well for Venus Flytraps as it works for some other carnivorous plants"

    I'm not saying you are wrong in any way or anything, because things that work for one person might work well for the next. I just had horrible results over the last two dormacy's using the Fridge method. It especially isn't good when it is tried by the hands of a newbie whos plants aren't what you call in the best condition. Last season, I lost almost all my Venus Flytraps to the fridge. When they first came out of dormacy they grew less then perfect, but then it was downhill from there. Most of them just stopped growing and rotted away. Luckily some of the healthiest ones made, and now they are JUST beggining to make descent traps.
    -Maybe I should stop listening to Barry Rice and just about every single Venus Flytrap Expert out there...J/K


    That's just my two cents,
    Peter
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  6. #14
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Well then I guess my 20 VFT's arent smart enough to realize they are supposed to die every winter in the fridge!
    they are in there for 4 months every winter, wrapped up tight, no air circulation..they always live.
    so obviously air circulation is not an absolute requirement.
    so when I say the "fridge method works fine", im going on 10 winters of personal experience, not anything someone said will or wont work..

    the fridge is MUCH MUCH better than a windowsill at 60 degrees..
    actually, the fridge is IDEAL! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/cool.gif[/img]
    constant stable temps just slightly above freezing..not too warm, not too cold..doesent get much better! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]

    yes, you WILL get fungus! but 99% of the time it does no damage at all..
    I have even stopped checking my plants for it during the winter..
    I put them in the fridge in late October and take them out mid February..
    there is always a fine whispy growth of fungus on most of the plants..
    BUT!..I always cut away all the leaves above the surface of the pot before they go in, leaving only short stumps..the fungus grows on these stumps, but the roots are unaffected by it..
    in the spring, new growth comes from the rhizome anyway, so if fungus grows on the short stumps of last year's leaves, it matters not to the plant..

    if you have harsh deadly cold winters like I do, or winters that are too warm,
    the fridge is EXCELLENT!
    much much much better than a warm windowsill..
    warm windowsill, even at 60 degrees, = almost certain death.
    maybe not right away, but within 2 or 3 years..
    Fridge dormancy = almost certain survival for year after year after year..
    and happy healthy well-rested plants!
    it works..I have seen it work for many years..
    Scot

  7. #15

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    Hey Scottychaos you are changing the subject on me and putting words in my mouth. You are changing the subject by giving advice to other people in different climates, I thought in the last posts we were helping only The 92nd Fish here, not giving advice to other people....
    Also, you are PUTING words in my mouth. I NEVER said anything about leaving the plants in the house on the windsill! I specifically said that they would DO GREAT OUTSIDE in NATURE were there are temperature flucuations and photosynthysis to help aid the plant for next year. So again, I think it's better to leave your plants outside if the weather permits. It'll go through phytosynthysis, have air circulation, and you don't have to worry about any fungus growth. I'm sure the Temperatures over at The 92nd Fish is below the minium temps for over three months. If not, notice that I asked him if temps are below a certain level and not just assuming it!

    Oh yeah, also you leave all the traps on the plant saving energy also.
    In fridge dormacy, you have the chance of fungus, the plant LOSES energy both through the lack of Phytosythysis and having all their leaves trimmed off.

    I just don't get it Scotty, you post links about Barry Rices information regarding dormacy, preeching by it, and now you are going AGAINST what he says totally. DO your reading before you post something, if you post something about barry, then stick to his information.

    Thanks,
    Peter
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  8. #16
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    chill out and stop fighting. what works for one grower may or may not work for another grower. VFT's aren't so touchy, just leave them outside and barely damp and they'll be fine. if your worried they'll freeze, place the pot the vft is in inside a larger pot filled with dirt, but dont bury the pot. the dirt will provide extra insulation.

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