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Thread: The controversial flytrap dormancy.....

  1. #1

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    I've seen several threads on here about whether a Flytrap needs dormancy every year, and for that matter what constitutes dormancy.

    In a previous post I made about "A Nice Pot Of Flytraps" I showed a photo of some Flytraps I grew outdoors year around in La Mesa, California on a North Facing Balcony/Deck. La Mesa is a suburb of San Diego about 8 miles inland from the coast. During the winter Months The night time temperatures were typically Upper 40's to Low 50's and the days were upper 60's to low 70's, and it almost never frosted, maybe once in the 6 years I lived there. I had this pot of Flytraps for 6 years in these conditions. In the winter the plants would start producing much smaller and compact growth, but would never completely die back. They always maintained these smaller leaves throught out the winter. In Spring they would begin to flower (which I would cut off) and then produce large traps all summer. This went on for 6 years with no ill effects on the plants. The North Facing Balcony probably helped, because in the Winter the sun was in the Southern hemisphere and the plants would recieve only indirect light and cooler temperatures, and in the Summer the sun is in the Norther hemisphere and the plants would recieve direct sunlight for most of the day. Here is a picture of these plants in their 5th or 6th year of these conditions, and I would think you would aggree they don't get much more vigorous or healthy than this.



    By the way here is a picture of a S. Purpurea grown in these exact same conditions for that same time period.


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    they should get dormancy they might be healthy now but next year they will come back bigger and may even multiply. Good Luck

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    hmmmm? Did you even read the post flytrapper9000? I think the slowed growth and the onset of smaller winter leaves does constitute dormancy this was the point I was trying to make that dormancy doesn't nescessarly mean dying completely back to the rhizome.

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    Great exaamples. I might post a pic on my VFT breaking "windowsill dormancy" here in Southern California. Jason, I'm sure you miss SD weather.
    VFT's to offer here===>http://www.phongvft.org

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Apparently, there are 2 levels of dormancy. One is the slow growth and the other is the deep sleep. In their native North Carolina, these plants see all 4 seasons. Although we're not Talking about Minnesota cold or Buffalo snow, they DO see snow and sub-freezing temps. They're equipped to handle it. I think that those who live in coastal California are seeing more moderate conditions that NC. It isn't quite as hot in summer nor cold in winter. If kept outside year round, they are probably experiencing more of a slow growth than those who live in areas that are colder than NC. One has to either put them in a fridge (or cool garage) or mulch them, as does WildBill in Connecticut. Those are more likely to experience deep sleep.

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    Dormancy is often thought of as a complete shutdown. In the wild in NC, winter temperatures are often mild or even warm. They have periods of slow growth and times when they stop alltogether, but the leaves don't all vanish leaving a bare rhizome. The first time I gave my plants dormancy I was worried because I expected all the traps to die and vanish. Some plants look in full growth even if it's constantly very cold, others may die back more. It seems to be a genetic trait as well - my Red Dragon and Red Piranha usually only have one lonesome trap left over winter, but the majority are still fairly bushy.
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  7. #7
    GreenDragonFlyTraps
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    He is correct. My venus fly trap did not die back but it did enter dormancy. This is not uncommon.

  8. #8
    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    Here in San Jose, the weather conditions are nearly identical to the native area of North Carolina. The only difference is rainfall and humidity. VFTs grow VERY well here. I think many people confuse dormancy with a compleate dying off of all leaves. My plants revert to the small winter rosette with all leaves being short, wide, and laying flat to the soil. In spring, they return to a normal active growth pattern with long thin leaves with large traps and eventually flowers. Most Californians are blessed with ideal CP weather (if they would just stop freaking out about humidity).

    Steve
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