User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 13 of 13

Thread: Dormancy

  1. #9
    ChronoKiento's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Pennsylvania z6
    Posts
    1,580
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I absolutely DESPISE the refrigerator method. One, I tried it last year and lost all but one of my CPs. Two, they get NO LIGHT except when the fridge door is opened which means they can't photosynthesize so they are lacking in energy. Three, they lose all their leaves and have to start off the season with a slow start and have to recover and it took about TWO MONTHS for my VFT to get on a regular growing schedule again. That's why I'll never do the fridge method again.

    I remember that method you are talking about, JimScott. You're supposed to burry the pot so that it looks like the plant is growing in the ground and then cover it with pine needles and mulch over it to keep it from freezing. BUT again, it keeps it from getting sunlight.

    I must think of a new way! A revolutionary way to get CPs through dormancy in the Northeast! *stands on top of a mountain and poses*
    Growlist
    I'm back?

  2. #10
    scottychaos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Western New York, USA
    Posts
    2,970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (ChronoKiento @ Aug. 16 2005,3:25)]I absolutely DESPISE the refrigerator method. One, I tried it last year and lost all but one of my CPs. Two, they get NO LIGHT except when the fridge door is opened which means they can't photosynthesize so they are lacking in energy. Three, they lose all their leaves and have to start off the season with a slow start and have to recover and it took about TWO MONTHS for my VFT to get on a regular growing schedule again. That's why I'll never do the fridge method again.

    I remember that method you are talking about, JimScott. You're supposed to burry the pot so that it looks like the plant is growing in the ground and then cover it with pine needles and mulch over it to keep it from freezing. BUT again, it keeps it from getting sunlight.

    I must think of a new way! A revolutionary way to get CPs through dormancy in the Northeast! *stands on top of a mountain and poses*
    yeah, the fridge method isnt ideal...a more "natural" dormancy would be better. but if you have NO other options, (like me)its either the fridge or certain death..

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]One, I tried it last year and lost all but one of my CPs.
    hmmm..strange, thats very unusual.
    I have been doing it for 10 years and have lost maybe 2 plants total in 10 years. and thats with 20 or more plants every year..20 plants times 10 years is "200 fridge dormancys"..198 lived, 2 died.
    I have a 99% success rate.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] they get NO LIGHT except when the fridge door is opened which means they can't photosynthesize so they are lacking in energy.
    thats basically irrelevant with the fridge method, because at temps that cold they wont be growing anyway..they dont need any light because they arent growing. so lack of light is meaningless.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Three, they lose all their leaves and have to start off the season with a slow start and have to recover
    good point..and that is the only real drawback to the fridge method. but my plants have never really suffered because of that..I think thats more of a percieved loss than a real loss..
    if growing conditions are good, they recover just fine.

    yes, the fridge method isnt perfect..but ANY dormancy is far better than NO dormancy..
    fridge dormancy = survival.
    indoors all winter with no dormancy = certain death.
    outdoors in upstate NY = nearly certain death.

    the choice is clear..

    dont knock the fridge method if its your only option!

    I would like to try a heavily mulched outdoor bog someday..just need a yard first!
    I knwo people have sucessfully done it in these climates.
    but IMO its not really worth the risk for the way I grow my plants. the fridge is easier, and is much more mild than outdoors. someday I will try an in-ground bog and will then expirement with mulching..being in the ground helps a lot.

    CaRnIvORoUs_FrEaK,
    I wouldnt risk keeping your plants outdoors all winter..
    the risk of death is FAAAAARRRRRr higher than it would be if you tried the fridge..

    If you really want to try to keep them outdoors, your ONLY option is to bury the pots in the ground and put a TON of mulch on top! like a 2-foot layer of pine needles and/or leaves..keeping them out in the open air is certain death.

    I will try to restore the pictures in my fridge method demo..
    its getting to that time of year where people are asking about it again!

    Scot

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    62
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ive heard that vfts can survive without dormancy for at least one or two years before they become noticably sluggish and from a guy is almost 18 and has been growing cps since he was four.

  4. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    KANSAS
    Posts
    173
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Out of 'Vitro' they can, but they need it every year after that; either mild or deep dormancy; and, oh yea, repot.

  5. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Paramus,NJ
    Posts
    272
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Like I said before the mulching thing just wont work for me. I dont know where to get the proper things, I dont have time to build a hole in the ground to mulch them, and my backyard doesnt have space. Maybe next year or the year after that.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •