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Thread: Pinguicula 'Enigma'

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Here is a plant of Pinguicula 'Enigma':
    It was growing with two others in a 2-1/4 inch pot. They had forced each other over the edges of the pot. When I removed them to harvest leaves and to repot, I discovered that they had long since lost any connection of their root systems with the media, they had just uprooted themselves sometime earlier.



    Oops, this one is somewhat out of focus. A photo of the underside of the plant:



    Here is a photo of the leaves harvested for propagation:



    And here is the plant ready for repotting:

    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    You know, this is an incredibly informative post, especially for newbies like me. It is quite reassuring to see pictures of a Pinguicula root system. Thank you for posting this, PinguiculaMan! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Corey

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    Yes my P. 'enigma'[Edit: Should read, P. 'Enigma'. The first letters of cultivar names are always capitalized.] gives about two plantlets per winter leaf pulled




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    thats awesome, I had a P. Enigma[Edit: Should read, P. 'Enigma'. The first letters of cultivar names are always capitalized and they are enclosed in single quotes.] but it grew backwards for some reason, then one day just died [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img]



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    Michael's Avatar
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    A question (or two) from a ping-ignorant person. Is it common for pings to become separated from their root system on their own? Can they survive for long without it, or do they start sprouting new roots? Curiously, Mike
    Fishing: A Perpetual Series of Occasions for Hope....

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    It is a little difficult to see, the photo is out-of-focus, but the root system is not very extensive and most of this plants root system is confined to a little ball of pumice/sand/peat that has dried and hardened like concrete. Moisture loosens it up, but it has been dry for at least several days to two weeks.

    Michael,
    Most Pinguicula do not have very extensive root systems. In their environment they don't need it. This is especially true for the Mexican species, hybrids, and cultivars. Even those that have more root system than most other Pinguicula, in my opinion, just seem to have it to anchor themselves more firmly in their natural habitat. It is quite common for their basal leaves to reflex and uproot them, they are then more easily translocated and the manner in which their leaves are attached predisposes them to detach when disturbed in this way. The hypothesis is that they then develop plantlets and establish when located in suitable areas.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    A question for you, PinguiculaMan:

    Is P. 'Enigma' the same cultivar as P. Yucca Do 1715? If so, how does it differ from the regular Pinguicula cyclosecta?

    Just curious,
    Corey

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    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Yes, I believe it was once identified with the descriptor: Yucca Do 1715; see: Yucca Do information on Pinguicula.org

    Under my conditions the differences I've noted are:
    1) The leaf surface and stalked glands are only pigmented lavender in the immediate vicinity of the leaf margins and many fewer of them have the dark pigmentation. I can only see it clearly with 8x magnification or greater.
    2) The flowers are also very much lighter in color than most other clones of Pinguicula cyclosecta.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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