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Thread: 5 packs of Darlingtonia seed for s.a.s.e.

  1. #9
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    What is your approach to germinating the seeds? Will they need to be cold stratified first?

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    Hi,
    All sase's have been sent (with the exception of the person who sent me $1 for postage in place of a sase. Please PM me your address and I'll send yours out.)

    Jim, they would probably do well with a few weeks of cold stratification.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    That's what I thought. And after that, what approach do you take to germinating them? I've had one opportunity a couple years ago and got nothing. I have another opportunity now, and I don't like to get burned twice. When you say cold stratification, do you mean to toss a packet in the fridge or do you mean something more sophisticated, like putting the seeds in a wet paper towel, in a baggie, with fungicide?

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    I'd wrap the seed in a paper towel (with a little fungicide, if desired), wet it, put it in a ziplock and stick it in the fridge for about month.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Not too late in the season to get things started?

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    If you plan on growing them indoors during the winter, you can start them any time. Here's a link with more detailed information:

    http://www.carnivorousplants.org/see...rlingtonia.htm

  7. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Thanks for the link. I copy & pasted what is relevant to what I want to do, which is keep them indoors, at least through next March:

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]For seeds to be started indoors or in a greenhouse, the seed should be stratified in the refrigerator. The method that uses the least space in the refrigerator is to place the seeds in a small plastic bag with a few large pinches of damp chopped sphagnum. Keep the seed in the refrigerator 4 weeks.

    Sow the seed on the surface of finely chopped sphagnum moss. Live sphagnum works best but needs to be trimmed back regularly. Don't bury the seed. Place seed about 5 mm apart. If the seed have not already been stratified, put the pot in a plastic bag and store in a refrigerator, garage, or other location that stays between a few to 10 degrees above freezing for 4 weeks.

    After stratification, move the pots to a bright, location. You may leave the pots in the plastic bags until the seeds start to germinate. As soon as they start to germinate, remove the pots from the bags or at least open the tops and put the pots in a sunny location or under lights. Darlingtonia don't need as much light as Sarracenia but they do need lots of light to show their best colors.

    The plants should remain in pure sphagnum. Darlingtonia grows best in loosely packed long fibered sphagnum moss. Live sphagnum moss is probably best but has to be closely watched as it can overgrow small plants. Top water the plants regularly. Many members put ice cubes of pure (distilled or reverse osmosis) water on the soil surface every day during hot weather. Others pump cooled water into the pots. What ever you do, larger pots will be a more stable environment. Air temperatures and humidity are not major issues as long as the roots are cool.

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