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Thread: Need: D. rotundifolia from specific locations; P. lutea (any location)

  1. #17
    SDCPs's Avatar
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    I might be stuck with tyacyi and capillaris them. I really would like d. rotundifolia--I think.

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    Lucky Greenhorn Lil Stinkpot's Avatar
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    If you slope the level of the soil in the bog so that one side is wetter than the other, you could keep the soggier plants on that end. Then you could also put in Saracenia psittacina, Drosera intermedia, and maybe some soggy Utricularias.
    If you shake a rain stick, you get rain. I need a hamata stick.
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    Ok, I'll have to do that. Does anyone have some intermedia from the warmer states? I have a seedling from Canada! I don't know how I wind up with cold things!

  4. #20
    ermahgerd petmantis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SDCPs View Post
    My bog is definately not that wet...I hope d. rotundifolia like it drier than d. intermedia!
    I'd say....who cares!(good thing) This is a D. rotundifolia in a bog about 20 minutes from my house, the pic is not mine btw.

    http://forumcarnivore.org/images/reporter/quebec17.jpg

    As you can see, it's growing on a tree trunk. Lol.
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    <Brokken> Heli: The hamburglar.

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    Ok, thanks mantis! I will grow them in my bog without worry; sin preocupades (I think that's right!)

  6. #22
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Ok, I'll PM you later with an address so I can SASE you some D. rotundifolia seed. You'll have to do some homework and read Darwin's chapters on D. rotundifolia in his "Insectivorous Plants". A link was posted in the general section and in the past I posted links to a site that has online and downloadable copies of the first editions in England and the US. There is also a poor copy of the rare second edition that has corrections and amendments from further studies. You can summarize some what you think are his more interesting experiments, observations and conclusions. Maybe even think up a few experiments of your own. Do a good job and maybe the mods will put your post up as a sticky or an article.

    Also plants and seeds from these seeds are not to be sold for more than a couple bucks. You are encouraged to give away or trade plants and seeds from these to seed banks and the trading post here.

    I don't know what you are expecting. Some of the reasons why D. rotundifolia are hard to come by is that most growers consider it too common to be interesting. It seldom has much color outside the glands and tentacles, certainly not the deep rich reds of D. brevifolia or the South American and South African Drosera. They seldom have a nice shade of green either - usually a sickly yellowish olive. In cultivation D. rotundifolia spends up to 50% or more of it's time in dormancy or semi-dormancy. After a couple years of this nonsense people give up on it.

    You can grow them in peat/sand (perlite, pumice etc.). They are typically found in Sphagnum bogs. The preferred substrate is constantly wet long fibre sphagnum or live Sphagnum.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  7. #23
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    Smile

    That's after I grow the plants...right?

    Pm'd you. Thanks for your consideration. Post will be updated straight away.

    Yes, I'm not really sure what to expect...but, I know that d. rotundifolia doesn't always look that bad, as shown in these pictures: Rotundifolia (galoria carnivora)

    If the rotundifolia is ANYTHING like ANY of these pictures...I'm in love with it already.

    Let me ask...are the rotundifolia from different locations in California very different from each other? I know the costal form doesn't need a dormancy. That would be cool to have.

    Your seeds are from the "big lagoon"?

  8. #24
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    The plants the get the most red in the petioles and laminae are typically from the highland locations. It probably has more to do with the intensity of light than genetic predisposition of the plants. How Drosera look in the wild can differ quite a bit to how they look in cultivation.

    If the Alaska plants aren't red enough for you what are you going to do if the California plants aren't either?

    Do they differ greatly depending on location? Not really. If you removed the labels and mixed them up and came back a few days later you probably couldn't match all the labels up correctly.

    If you don't give the plants dormancy they grow very slowly and won't flower or the flowers will be infertile. If you want vigorous plants and seed, give them dormancy. Big Lagoon is coastal, the plants want dormancy. Ivan Snyder selected one plant from Gasquet, CA (considered coastal) and one from Willow Lake (highland - near Mt. Lassen) both of which had relaxed dormancy requirements and crossed them. One of the offspring did not require dormancy and became known as D. 'Charles Darwin'. If you grow 'Charles Darwin' under lights it may not go dormant. If you grow it outdoors it acts like any other D. rotundifolia and goes in and out of semi-dormancy seemingly at random and dormant for the winter. Without dormancy it remains vigorous and will flower producing viable seed. Seed offspring from self pollination retain the characteristics of the parent plant. So the only D. rotundifolia that I know of that doesn't need dormancy. If coastal plants as a whole do not need dormancy than Ivan Snyder would not have had to selectively breed 'Charles Darwin'.

    The seeds I'm sending you, yes.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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