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Thread: Updates on the ivory montys

  1. #105

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    Ok, thats what I thought. So they keep these notes to themselves to keep the exact location secret to public and offer it only to certain people(maybe other collectors planning another collection).

    Also, when they mention that Nothobranchius live in small bodies of water, how small are they talking about? Many seem to be worded in a way that mentions a small puddle(which seems unlikely). My guess is that the nothos would end up in a large shallow depression like the vernal pools we have here. How big they are I dunno. Also, on cincikillies.org one article mentioned N. ocellatus, saying that they are very aggresive and there are seldom more than 6-8 per pool in the wild? Also makes me wonder how crowded the nothos are in the pools, and if eggs are ever transfered between any neighboring pools perhaps by floods. There's also the thing that they live in dry places like fairy or brine shrimp...but seeing that the eggs must be incubated at pretty good moisture levels i'm guessing the dry season is when there is simply no puddles...or perhaps maybe only a crust forms over the soil, and the eggs which have been buried underneath it survive.


    Just curious, but will nothobranchius react to a mirror in the same way, say, a betta would?

    Haven't seen the package yet. Maybe on Monday?

    Got Hikari frozen bloodworms in a flat pack but have yet to try it out.

    How old are the Kafuensis? The article you sent mentions that the author(Bob Morenski) usually sets them up for breeding at 2-3 months...these things must grow pretty fast!

    Keep me updated on those new arrivals of yours!


    On a note of interest, I remember one time several years ago when I was going to move a group of baby kribs to the 46 gallon bowfront. I got them into the yogurt tub without problems...but when I released one the paradise fish promptly gobbled it. However, I decided to try to add a couple but this time put them near the bottom. Sure enough, when they were on the bottom, they were ignored by the paradise fish for the most part. They were most vulnerable while falling through open water. While a couple did get eaten, next June I traded in a group of small-just starting to sex out kribs for 40 dollars or so in store credit.
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  2. #106

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    Hi N,

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Ok, thats what I thought. So they keep these notes to themselves to keep the exact location secret to public and offer it only to certain people(maybe other collectors planning another collection).

    Only if its a potential new species that must be described. Once the species is described the location is published. Killie guys are a pretty open group.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Also, when they mention that Nothobranchius live in small bodies of water, how small are they talking about? Many seem to be worded in a way that mentions a small puddle(which seems unlikely). My guess is that the nothos would end up in a large shallow depression like the vernal pools we have here. How big they are I dunno.

    They can be quite large like a pond or just a roadside ditch that is small or all along the road or a mashy grassy bog that goes on forever. If it floods populations can get moved around or even destroyed. Some ponds are near rivers. I will send you a dvd on collecting Nothos with the breeding one next month. Its by Dr. Watters who is the world's authority on Nothos. He may be speaking in San Francisco in April at the killie convention there. Think about going. It's a great weekend affair.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Also, on cincikillies.org one article mentioned N. ocellatus, saying that they are very aggresive and there are seldom more than 6-8 per pool in the wild? Also makes me wonder how crowded the nothos are in the pools, and if eggs are ever transfered between any neighboring pools perhaps by floods.
    Oh, ocellatus is a killer -- a big predator. Only a few live in a pond and they eat small Nothos. They are very difficult to breed and feed. Morenski rasies them. The fry literally eat one another as do the adults. The Megalebias in South America do the same thing. Their eggs can be bigger than a beebee -- I used to raise Meg. elongatus years ago. I had to have feeder guppies and earthworms all the time!

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    There's also the thing that they live in dry places like fairy or brine shrimp...but seeing that the eggs must be incubated at pretty good moisture levels i'm guessing the dry season is when there is simply no puddles...or perhaps maybe only a crust forms over the soil, and the eggs which have been buried underneath it survive.
    I think things may get drier in the wild but really dry in captivity doesn't work. I think its the small amount of peat used in storage which is why I always use a pint to a quart for breeding and storage. Incubation goes better. The water in nature goes and the surface cracks but moisture stays in the deeper parts of the dirt.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Just curious, but will nothobranchius react to a mirror in the same way, say, a betta would?
    Nope but furzeri has the expandable gills like a Betta and will show them to another male. Bad thing is they only live 6 months -- literally -- and their eggs take from 6 weeks to 9 months to hatch. They come from areas of very erratic rainfall so the eggs have adapted to a broad range of development times to insure survival. I'm hoping to get some of the new collections of furzeri from Italy. They are gorgeous -- a green/yellow/red form and a red form.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Haven't seen the package yet. Maybe on Monday?
    Let me check.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Got Hikari frozen bloodworms in a flat pack but have yet to try it out.
    Cool.


    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    How old are the Kafuensis? The article you sent mentions that the author(Bob Morenski) usually sets them up for breeding at 2-3 months...these things must grow pretty fast!
    Mine are around 6-7 weeks now and half grown but fully developed. Let me know when you want yours. They are all the reds but maybe a little intermediate. The males are so fine. Annual killies mature in 4-5 months and sex out in 3-5 weeks. They are fast and are the perfect fish for the home hobbyist/breeder as you can control all aspects of their life cycle.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Keep me updated on those new arrivals of yours!
    One new monty died and the snails got it. The rest are ok but all species are skinny. It's conditioning time -- unless they have worms -- ugh.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    On a note of interest, I remember one time several years ago when I was going to move a group of baby kribs to the 46 gallon bowfront. I got them into the yogurt tub without problems...but when I released one the paradise fish promptly gobbled it. However, I decided to try to add a couple but this time put them near the bottom. Sure enough, when they were on the bottom, they were ignored by the paradise fish for the most part. They were most vulnerable while falling through open water. While a couple did get eaten, next June I traded in a group of small-just starting to sex out kribs for 40 dollars or so in store credit.
    Fish are funny about eating fry. It never fails to amaze me what will survive when it shouldn't. I wish I could get that roundtail Paradisefish!

    You should see my calabarica tank -- their are young adults everywhere -- full house. Such a different outcome from my first 2 pairs.

    I sent the kretseri to a breeder friend who had a spawning pair and my male is already building a nest for him. I hope he can breed my pair too and we get lots of fry to distribute.

    Bobby

  3. #107

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    Wow, hard to imagine something eating other nothos, but hey, thats the way things go. Kinda like wondering whyat eats zebra plecos or discus in the wild.

    For the kafuensis(perhaps we should abbreviate em as KAF) when you say a bit intermediate do you mean these Red form show a bit of blue or there are a few intermediates mixed in?

    Sorry to here about the 1 monty. I'm assuming by worms you mean camallanus worms? I haven't had experience them, and they seem pretty nasty. Just curious, but would getting them from eggs eliminate the worm problem for killies?

    On the topic of disease, the article mentions "Notho Fade Disease" as a disease kafuensis is quite vulnerable to-have you experienced it?

    BTw, have you seen Fp. gardneri 'Mamfese'(sp.) by any chance? A few images of this came up on google and it looks very different from most of the other gardneri locations.

    Also, any updates on those fairy shrimp? I was looking back I noticed that.
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  4. #108

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    "Wow, hard to imagine something eating other nothos, but hey, thats the way things go. Kinda like wondering whyat eats zebra plecos or discus in the wild.

    For the kafuensis(perhaps we should abbreviate em as KAF) when you say a bit intermediate do you mean these Red form show a bit of blue or there are a few intermediates mixed in?"


    I'm not sure yet. I think mainly red but I have not seen enough to tell to really tell the types.


    "Sorry to here about the 1 monty. I'm assuming by worms you mean camallanus worms?"

    Maybe, but I don't see anything. The fish are just too thin. They are eating well and the way I feed it won't be long. People must kind of wonder when they get my "fat" fish .


    "I haven't had experience them, and they seem pretty nasty. Just curious, but would getting them from eggs eliminate the worm problem for killies?"


    Not always from what I hear but it is rare and there are treatments. Glugea is worse with Nothos -- an internal bug. Flubendazole 5% works well on Glugea. Lavamsol (spelling?) on the Callmanus worms.

    "On the topic of disease, the article mentions "Notho Fade Disease" as a disease kafuensis is quite vulnerable to-have you experienced it?"

    Once when the temperature got too high and the air was too low. Nothos need 2-3 daily small feedings of good food, slow, slow slow filtration and clean water. Notho wasting is usually stress related from environment. Blackworms in clean calm water usually prevents it. Flubendazole 5% plus live baby brine shrimp feedings, and 74F temp. usually brings them back.


    "BTw, have you seen Fp. gardneri 'Mamfese'(sp.) by any chance? A few images of this came up on google and it looks very different from most of the other gardneri locations."


    Yes, but I forget its look. There are some gorgeous gardneri and gardneri is a bold hardy fish but a bit aggressive.


    "Also, any updates on those fairy shrimp? I was looking back I noticed that."

    My friend lost them but he had great success for a while. They hatch after a few days in really dry peat and lay tons of eggs.

    Your surprise should be shipped next week if all goes well. I checked. Should I send the Mambova this weekend?

    Bobby

  5. #109

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    Bobby: That may work. I've been doing some tests to see if I can keep the temp up high enough for them.

    Also, if they are in a tank with sand...will they lay eggs in the sand? Any way to salvage these ones?

    What constitutes "slow" filtration. One guy on Killitalk claimed that he losts many nothos do to an airstone. I have an old fluval filter which eventually becomes so clogged up you can't tell its running...but when it is clean there is a noticeable current. If I directed it to the glass would that work?
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

  6. #110

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    nice... must have pictures

  7. #111

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    Hi N,

    Nothos will spawn in sand although I don't like it. Keep the layer very thin to avoid pollution problems. You can take the fish out and gently store the sand and see the eggs come out or you can siphon the sand into a bucket. The sand will settle fast and then take a net and do a figure 8 briskly in the water and you should collect alot of eggs that way. I still believe bare bottom tanks painted flat black on the outside bottom and a bowl of boiled, rinsed peat is the best.

    A fluval is too much even dirty. Just use old fashion corner filters with a bit of floss at the bottom and then small gravel on top of that to the top of the filter box. Makes a great little biological filter. Have the air running slow so you can almost but not quite count the bubbles coming out the lift tube. Sponge filters work too. No power filters.

    The new fish are doing well. I really like the Limias. He is sending another population of the Limias and some of the red picta. Another friend is sending more blue gularis and returning some of my old zonatus FINCA to me -- that is a spectacular fish. I am happy about that. The lacortei are all sexed out now and the arnoldi and gave me great sex ratios. Let me know on the kafuensis --- Sat. after this one?

    Bobby

  8. #112

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    You could do it next week if you wish. I will be removing some sand, and then things should be ready.

    Great to here on the new arrivals! Keep me updated when the rest come in. Mind telling me how the limias are like?

    BTw, the surprise package should be floating in the mail?

    Also, how do you store large quantities of blackworms? as of now I usually just get a large container to put them in...some mention putting them in the fridge. Have you ever tried culturing them?
    1 Nxventrata

    D. muscipula & D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'(barely)

    Sarracenia leucophylla(seedling)

    S. purpurea and Drosera filiformis filiformis/ intermedia seeds waiting to sprout.

    Drosera capensis

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