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Thread: Most valuable CP in the industry?

  1. #25
    mobile's Avatar
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    I think the situation might be a little different in the USA compared to Europe; however, Cephalotus are becoming quite common nowadays. Even the traditionally 'rare' clones such as 'Hummer's Giant' are quite common and thus the value has depreciated significantly. There are still a few exceptions, such as 'Eden Black'. Recently a couple of small examples (immature pitchers) of sister to Eden Black, aka "Tank Ceph 2" have sold for 123.88 and 255.00 on eBay UK but even this is relatively cheap for a rare clone. However, as others have mentioned, a plant should not be judged on its monitory value. Some 'rare' plants are also beautiful, such as 'Eden Black' but others are not that special and are simply expensive due to there rarity. Personally, I don't derive any more pleasure from my 'Hummer's Giant' than I do from my mature 'typical' Cephalotus but size for size I know which one would fetch the highest selling price.
    Last edited by mobile; 12-27-2010 at 10:25 AM.

  2. #26
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    As Steve already commented - not really. They are nice plants and are grown & appreciated by a significant number of CP growers, but as an investment, their 'mania-phase' peaked a few years ago and their prices continue to plummet.
    I think another factor is that there has been a lot of progress in Cephalotus cultivation techniques. When I got into the hobby people treated Cephs like they were made of glass. Only a few advanced growers I came across were adept with the genus. Individuals like WildBill were still aggregating the experiences of others and evaluating different clones. These days people are far more adventurous and even novices are reporting great successes. Cephs are established in people's collections and there's less demand for them commercially.
    Nepenthes, on the other hand, have been well-known in conservatories for over a century. People are still working to pin down all of their habits and cultural preferences; it's a far more diverse genus so different species are bound to have different quirks and demands. The fact that new species and natural hybrids are being discovered all the time, and that there is a market for complex artificial hybrids akin to the orchid trade, drives a collector's habit to which Cephalotus doesn't really compare. It's slight hyperbole, but you could say that there's a higher rate of Nepenthes addiction.
    And at the risk of sounding shallow, Nepenthes are big, and people like big things. A full-grown Cephalotus looks like a cryptic little lump next to a healthy juvenile N. x Miranda. While Cephs are really awesome, they don't really catch the eye of someone who doesn't know what they're looking for, unless they happen to get up real close. A mature Nepenthes is something that you could put in a conservatory as the centerpiece of an entire room.
    ~Joe
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  3. #27
    mobile's Avatar
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    I find that my Heliamphora attract more interest from visitor to my house than Cephalotus. If enough interest is shown I go into details of their natural habitat and that generally gets people even more intrigued. Newly discovered Heliamphora also initially sell for high prices; however, due to them being cultivated in-vitro in Europe, they become more common in a reasonably short period of time.

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