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Thread: Managing Dormancy

  1. #11

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    The hardware:

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  2. #12
    Grey Moss's Avatar
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    Fan cooling would not work unfortunately. Austin should be good for a lot of the NA cps as they grow in the southeast into the Gulf Coast. You'll just have to make sure that the terrarium does not up too much if you put it outside.

  3. #13

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    Dormancy is triggered by shorter photo periods more so than temperature. So, cutting down the time your lights are on should do a good job of making them dormant.

  4. #14

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    So I may not necessarily need to reduce the temperature just by providing less light? It would be possible for me to move the terrarium outside but we have some unusual winters. This winter has been one... I have two huge, three year old Boston ferns that I have just covered in the past. This winter we had one 19 night (highly unusual for South Texas) and they barely survived. Then we will have following days in the upper 80s.

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  5. #15

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    What I would do under stipulated conditions:
    In Sept. gradually step down the amount of light the plants get until it is roughly equal outside light at the end of Oct.. At the end of Oct. put the plants outside, in the shade and out of the wind and then leave them there until Feb., then bring them back inside and gradually increase light levels to whatever you deem necessary.

    What I would do if at all possible:
    Grow the plants entirely outside.

    Just in case you are unaware, there is no dormancy needed for Drosera aliciae.

  6. #16

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    I appreciate the suggestions. I was told emphatically by a professional vft grower that, no matter what I did, vft's will *never* thrive in a terrarium. My thoughts were I could design a terrarium to prove them wrong. However, the more feedback I get, I'm beginning to doubt that will be possible.

    I live in an apartment and the location of the terrarium gets very little natural light and no direct light. Any direct light would be artificial.

    I didn't know about the D. Aliciae not needing dormancy - thanks. I may have to choose my plants for the environment instead of the other way around.

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  7. #17

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    There's actually two stages of dormancy, Eco-dormancy and endo-dormancy. In endo-dormancy the plant is in an halted state, will not grow. In this stage the plants count chilling units to keep track of time passed. After it counts the appropriate amount of units the plant will transition into eco-dormancy. The plant will not respond to warmer weather in endo-dormancy stage. The temperature and shortening of daylight are the inducing factors here.

    Eco-dormancy is more light related. The plant is technically "sleeping" but is ready to be awaken. This is the hovering stage while the plant is waiting for the right weather to wake up. Weather can bring a plant to life at any point in this stage.

    Now, I believe (I've never tested this part so I don't know for sure) that cueing back the photo period and just using eco-dormancy could be an option for a longer term survival of a completely controlled environment temperate plant. Whether it grows or thrives I don't know. I'm sure it would survive longer term than a plant given no dormancy.

    I personally follow the nature rule and try to keep my plants in a habitat that closely mimics their natural habitat. Which for most NA CP's means endo-dormancy, and being outside if you live in the US.

    Best of luck however you decide to go.

    Boarderlib's grow list : Grow Lists
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  8. #18

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    Thanks for the info!

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  9. #19

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    Bob please!

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  10. #20

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    I have no idea what that means or how that text got there. My apologies... I underwent a medical procedure and was under anesthesia. Please disregard! Thanks.

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