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Thread: Construction of a terrarium

  1. #9
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention.....the total cost was $200 for the terrarium setup and $100 for 12 plants....I don't think that's too bad. Now that you have a complete list of stuff and where to go, you can probably get all the stuff in one or two trips or order it online, and about one day to get the plants and setup the tank.

    You should not be discouraged by the setup....i am not a "handy man" by any means, but even I managed to setup my terrarium. Once it's setup, it is relatively maintenance-free for a long time.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  2. #10
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    One last post to look at some of your questions specifically that wasn't covered in my other email.

    In my humble opinion,

    1. As long as the sheet metal can be connected to make a well-enclosed tank and doesn't rust when exposed to high humidity, it should be fine. The metal may absorb heat which would increase the temperature of the tank though. Plywood or other wood is a bad idea as the high humidity will cause fungus to grow on it (and possibly later, on your plants). Overall, a used acquarium tank is best and is cheap.
    2. Aluminum is perfect for reflection and is much more practical, less bulky and expensive than stainless steel. A roll of aluminum foil is $2 at my supermarket.
    3. Keeping the plants in their pots is the easiest and most practical thing to do. they can be removed if they're sick or for dormancy or just to mix them around, they have thier own special blend of potting mix, and can either be standing in water or not. all these things can be impossible with a classic terrarium.
    3. I think the other questions were covered in my last emails.

    later,
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

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