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Thread: In ground bod garden?

  1. #25

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    Ok, I have a question that fits in well in this topic, maybe.
    Maybe someone that knows more about the soil requirements for CPs can let me know if this would works.
    I have an area in my yard that consists of this soil type. Would it be possible I could plant CPs directly into it, and they would do well?

    Ac Adrian Mucky Peat, Deep

    The Adrian series consists of deep, very poorly drained, organic soils that are underlain by sand. Ground water is at or near the surface throughout the year. These soils formed in sedges and marsh grasses that are encroached on in places by tamarack and shrubs.
    In a representative profile the surface layer is black mucky peat 12 inches thick. Very dark brown and black muck is between depths of 12-36 inches. The substratum is olive-grey sand.
    Adrian soils are moderately rapidly permeable. They have high available water capacity and low natural fertility.
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
    --P. J. O'Rourke
    GL

  2. #26

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    What is your potential hydrogen?
    How many hours of sun does this site receive per day?
    Do you or have you ever used any chemicals on your lawn?
    What state are you in? Do you know your Zone?

    Edited to note that you are in central Wisconsin which is a Hardiness Zone 4B most probably.

    Also, by any chance is that area denoted on your survey as being wetlands?

  3. #27

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    What is your potential hydrogen?
    -I have no clue. How would I find that out?

    How many hours of sun does this site receive per day?
    -It recieves full sun from sunrise till mid afternoon, and partial sun till sundown.

    Do you or have you ever used any chemicals on your lawn?
    -No, It is hardly a lawn tho, very sparse grass.
    -*edit* Atleast not in the past 25 years

    What state are you in? Do you know your Zone?
    - Yep, Wisconsin, and 4B.

    Also, by any chance is that area denoted on your survey as being wetlands?
    - No. The circumstances surrounding the lake I live on are quite unique in Wisconsin. The Area is around 20' by 50'
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
    --P. J. O'Rourke
    GL

  4. #28

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    Plant. I recommend sarracenia purpurea ssp. purpurea. Drosera rotundifolia and d. anglica. For grins, throw in a few d. linearis too. They can all handle the cold well. For pinguicula, p. vulgaris can handle it, and p. villosa. I do believe pinguicula macroceras ssp. macroceras might be able to handle that kind of cold. You can only try, and it is better than doing nothing. I will be waiting to hear how it goes, and how it grows.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  5. #29

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    I am not in Bugs' league but I think you are going to have problems with the underwater conditions regardless of the pH. You can get a basic pH test kit right here at JungleSupply.com above.

    D. anglica (does have a very short growing season though)
    D. intermedia
    P. villosa (I want one of these so if you find it let me know)
    P. vulgaris (I want one of these so if you find it let me know)
    S. purpurea ssp. purpurea
    S. psittacina
    S. minor var. okee (other minor species would not be good)
    S. flava (probably all of them)

    I'm thinking some of these can not only survive but might do quite well in obscenely wet conditions.

    From what I've learned, you'd probably want to stay away from rubra and most minor. I don't think they can handle a no drainage environment so their buds would most probably rot.

  6. #30

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    The LauraZ5 might be right, but to know for sure, after the ph test, time to plant the locals. If they make it, experiment. You won't know if you don't try. I have had CP growing in situations vastly different from the norm, and they did well. (Suprised me!!!!!)
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  7. #31

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    S. rubra ssp is my "pace and wring hands plant". I seem to have many issues with transplanting those. I am learning they do not like a lot of water though. Probably damp not wet with a dousing every so often to flush. I don't know what my problem with those is but one of these days I am going to figure out why I have so many problems transplanting them. They hate me, I swear that's it.

    You know Gawd_oOo, there are a few Utrics you could try in that type of an environment too. U. resupinata comes to mind and if you find where to buy one of those, let me know as that's one I'm looking for too. I'd also try U. macrorhiza as well as U. vulgaris.

    This is going to sound somewhat outlandish but; if your area tests alkaline, you could raise the pH a tad by using vinegar. A Tblsp into a gallon of rainwater might make what ever CP you ultimately choose feel more at home. Hold at 6.5 and see how the plants you select fair. I know there are people out there who raise pH by using rhodo and azalea products but I'd much prefer to go the route of adding white pine needles and a sprinkle here and there of vinegar in rain water.

  8. #32

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    Thanx for all the input. Soil is acidic, don't know to what extent. I am actually going to be bringing home a water sampling kit from school in the next 2 weeks, so I can do a pH test with that. And I have an entire line of white pine betwen the lot line so they shouldn't be a problem either.

    The site is only very wet during spring, in summer and fall the water table is 2-4 inches below the surface, there are a few spots that dip down and have standing water year round.

    It'll be fun, I'll snap some pics and show everything I do to prep the site, through to completion.
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
    --P. J. O'Rourke
    GL

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