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Thread: In ground bod garden?

  1. #1
    technoracer's Avatar
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    hello everyone!
    i'm thinking about building an in ground bog garden at my house this spring for my sarrs and vft's. i'm picturing a round area, maybe 5' in diameter and about a foot deep, lined to hold the soil and clean water. i'm thinking about his so i won't have to water everyday (as i do in the heat of summer in ohio) and for a little landscaping effect at the house. i know that i'll have to mulch for the winters, but i think that it'll pretty much take care of it's self most of the summer, provided i can keep the squirrels out of it (fencing and a moat around the outside?). should i keep the plants in their post, and just bury the whole pot in the soil? that would allow the plants to pull from the same water sourse, could look attractive, and would make it easy to dig up and divide the plants when needed.
    does anyone have a permanant install bog garden? have any picts or tips to just comments in general? what do ya think!?!

    peace,
    technoracer
    Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely.
    Some days you're the pigeon, some days you're the statue.

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Hmm well I don't have an in ground bog personally so can't comment on all your questions.

    I think you will find it will take quite a bit of water on your part. It wouldn't surprise me if it takes nearly as much as if you had kept your plants in water trays. In fact it may take more.

    Will you be able to access the circle from all sides? If not then 5' diameter may make it very hard to reach certain points of the bog, without getting into it yourself.

    12" deep may not be deep enough if you have mature Sarracenia.

    Rodents and what not will be a concern but you should also think about potential problems while maintaining the rest of your landscape/yard. Tap water from sprinklers, chemicals/fertilizer from lawns/shrubs etc.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    technoracer's Avatar
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    thanks for the comments tony!

    -yes, i will be able to reach it from all sides, so that won't be a problem. i am thinking a lot of water will come from a downspout that is there (i collect rain water for the plants already, so that should be ok).

    -i don't water the lawn, so i won't have to worry about tap water, but i do fertilize the grass in the spring, and know that i will have to be very carefull when applying it.

    -how deep would you suggest for mature sarrs?

    what i'm really looking for is a growing space that i will only have to water once a week, as i'm still thinking about taking a job that will keep me away for 5-7 days at a time.i don't really want to do a bunch of containers, as they would have to be huge to hold enough water, and could be less astetically pleasing. also, with above ground containers, i will have to move them around for winter, while i'm hoping an inground bog will be ok with mulching.

    plants will be limited to whatever i think will survive zone 5 ohio winters, plus anything i am willing to risk. my boss is giving me 2.5 cu ft of spaghnum moss, and i have about 2/3's of a bag (2 cu ft?), so all i really need to buy soilwise, is some sand or perlite to mix in.

    what do you think about leaving the sarrs in post, and planting the whole pot in the ground to make it easier to pull them out later to divide when necessary?

    thanks for the comments! keep them comming!

    peace,
    tech...
    Power corrupts. Absolute power corrupts absolutely.
    Some days you're the pigeon, some days you're the statue.

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Oh hmm unfortunately so far you have about the only avid cp collector that doesn't have a bog trying to give advice on a bog lol.

    Depth? Oh gosh. I think I would lean more towards at least 18" deep vs 12". That will give you more soil mass which will hold more water and dry at a slower rate. It will also give you more depth for roots to go and for extra water holding capacity. Which leads me to my next thought. I don't think sticking the whole pot in the bog would be a problem as long as the pot is sufficiently large in depth and width so that it does not hinder the plants to much degree. To do that though you're probably looking at 2+ gallon sized pots for large plants like S. leucophylla.
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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    And NEVER use perlite in an outdoor bog. If and or when it rains, you will have that garbage everywhere!!!
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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    1.5 feet deep minimum. My large sarr clumps reach down that far. I never fertilize the yard. Make sure the bog gets direct sun in the middle of the day or for 6-8 hours. This is the most impoertant rule. Only one half a day sun and you will have alge/mold/annoying crap killing your babies. You will not ever need to water it unless your live sphagnum/surface of bog feels dry (which is propbibly only when it is windy. Do not add drainage holes

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    Don't keep them in pots. Its too much of a hassle and in cold places grownd freeze and whatnot will heave the pots up and kill your cps

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    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
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    Frost heaving isn't caused by pots, although small ones might potentially heave as opposed to big ones which reach down deep into the bog. Which is why I suggested big pots only. Frost heave damage can occur to the plants if they are planted straight in the bog. The issue is insufficient mulching which causes excessive cycles of rapid freezing/thawing through the Winter.


    Personally I wouldn't use pots. Digging out a large clump to divide wouldn't be all that more difficult than unburying a large pot and trying to lift that out instead.

    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

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