Informational! Informational!:  3
Likes Likes:  4
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Utricularia from wetlands in Alaska

  1. #11
    jeff 2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    LE MANS - FRANCE
    Posts
    568
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bonjour

    For me U.vulgaris or U.macrorhiza, these 2 species are very close, just the spur of the corolla is different, so a picture would be more.

    The quadrifidal hairs inside the trap could also give information, but it's another story

    jeff

  2. #12
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,750
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    People can't see the pictures that I post. I am using Google Photo (ever since Photobucket held our photos hostage, for $400). How did you edit yours?

  3. #13
    nimbulan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,278
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    People can't see the pictures that I post. I am using Google Photo (ever since Photobucket held our photos hostage, for $400). How did you edit yours?
    She just uploaded them to a different image hosting site. I know there's a way you can make pictures on Google Drive publicly visible, but am not entirely sure how that's accomplished.

  4. #14
    Anne-Lise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hello Dexenthes and you all,

    Thank you for following up on this ID. The UAF herbarium (ARCTOS: http://arctos.database.museum/SpecimenSearch.cfm) reports Utricularia all over AK ! Once, I get mine IDed, I would love to know if it is the same species than your, Dexenthes !

    Jeff 2 wanted to see the spur of this flower but the only picture I've got where we can see one it far from being great and I am not sure that anything could be said from it. For the quadrifidal hairs, I'll need to do another microscopy as I did pics of the wrong hairs, yesterday

    I will open a thread about the genome of this plant. It will in the Utricularia section of the forum.
    There, I would like to discuss with you about ideas of what I could look at in this genome, what you would like to see in a paper: for instance a phylogenetic tree of the genus. I bet there are other things that would be great but that I'm not thinking about.

    Also, I really ponder about the resistance to the cold of this plant. I mean, the still water gets totally frozen over 2m of depth here during water. Thus, it means that the plant freezes hard every winter, thaw in April/May and keeps going for about 4 months before freezing again. When you think about it, this plant spends more time frozen than not. wow !

    I went back to the place where I collected the individual that I sequenced. I wanted to get some water and maybe some mud to prepare an aquarium. Indeed I kept a piece of the individual I sequenced in order to have some material in case I needed to do another run. For about 5 weeks now that my little guy has been in a masson jar, it grows well but it is not strong as the plants from the site or those I transplanted in my landlord's pond (see pics). I guessed that it doesn't like my jar that much.
    I just got back from my little field trip. Gosh, the water is super brackish: it stincks and it's crowed with little mosquitoe larvae. It is warm on the surface with the sun. I spotted a giant colony of Utricularia. I put my hand in the middle of it as I wanted to know how deep was the water. I can tell that I went up to my shoulder without reaching the bottom but the layer of Utricularia was also that thick ! On the surface, it is green/nice stems and deeper in is old brown resistant stems. I am amazed: it must be a very old colony. I really cross fingers that nobody will buy this lot and build on it.
    I attach a picture I just took on the site. You'll see a very limited part of the big colony and a picure of my landlord's pond with part of the plants I transplanted last year and some new that I brought from the big colony (I took less than 5% of it, no worries). It's my little guy with its super brackish water, in the tank.




    Last edited by Anne-Lise; 08-12-2017 at 06:55 PM.

  5. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,750
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What did you do / edit to make your pictures visible?

  6. #16
    Anne-Lise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I used http://www.zupimages.net/ instead of Google drive.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Hacienda Heights, CA USA
    Posts
    1,314
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The plant is probably macrorhiza, especially if it is free-floating. Utricularia vulgaris is not native to North America.

  8. #18
    Anne-Lise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you @Tanukimo for this additional criterium related to the absence of roots.
    @jeff 2: Here is a microscopy of a bladder. We can see a bunch of quadrifidal hairs floatting around. Another strong indication of U. macrorhiza it seems.


    Yesterday, I participated to a fish survey in the Chena Slough. It is part of the program of Elodea's eradication. I was surprised to find again Utricularia alive and well despite the herbicide disseminated against the invasive plant. I thought that Utricularias were found in bodies of still water only but definitely, they do well in streams ! See the pic bellow.

  9. #19
    jeff 2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    LE MANS - FRANCE
    Posts
    568
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    yes for U.macrorhiza .


    On U.macrorhiza : the quadrifids with the longer pair with apex apiculate,parallel or slightly divergent , the shorter pair with apex rounded, slightly to considerably divergent or slightly reflexed, with an included angle of up to 190


    To confirm with a photo of spur

    jeff
    Last edited by jeff 2; 08-15-2017 at 12:32 AM.

  10. #20
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,750
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    I used http://www.zupimages.net/ instead of Google drive.
    I'll have to look into that as well.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Saying hello from Alaska
    By Assassynation in forum Introduce Yourself!
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-21-2012, 12:54 AM
  2. Wetlands symposium in central, va
    By cobyguy in forum Conservation Station
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-28-2005, 07:44 PM
  3. Wetlands
    By Dyflam in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-23-2005, 07:03 AM
  4. Anti-wetlands bill
    By Ozzy in forum Conservation Station
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-15-2004, 04:03 PM
  5. Alaska
    By in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-10-2002, 07:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •