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Thread: Hello from India's widest collection of juvenile plants

  1. #1
    Vidyut's Avatar
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    Wink Hello from India's widest collection of juvenile plants

    I'm Vidyut and I'm from India and I've been lurking and reading on these forums for half a decade without interacting much, which has changed only sporadically in the last couple of years after I made an account. I have no particular claim to fame other than trying to grow plants for that long.

    Initially I killed all my plants, then most, then many, then several and now fewer. Along the way, the ones that survived seem to have turned into a rather varied collection of CPs for being in India. I think I have at least one of every genus other than utricularia and more than one of each genus other than Helis.

    That said, most of my plants are juveniles other than a few flowering Pinguicula aphrodites, drosera burmanii, spatulata, capensis, byblis and vining nepenthes mirabilis and ventratas. The juveniles include a rather large variety of nepenthes and several droseras.

    I do have an aim of eventually selling CPs in India, because it totally sucks that very few here sell more than a species or two and none sell consistently. All mostly hobbyists selling spares. World's largest democracy should have something right? So that is what I will be when I grow up. A mega grower of CPs.

    (I am in my 40s and still a juvenile grower. Beat that, nepenthes )

    In the meanwhile trying to figure out how not to kill them.
    Last edited by Vidyut; 02-03-2018 at 02:52 PM. Reason: Claimed to have a vining truncata when I meant ventrata. lol.
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

  2. #2
    Grey Moss's Avatar
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    Welcome formally to the forums. Its always interesting to hear about the experiences of people with carnivorous plants in other parts of the world, especially in areas with a lower carnivorous plant presence. Your goal to begin making a greater variety of carnivorous plants available for sale is a very lofty goal. I wish you luck with that. It's a big undertaking but is definitely a worthwhile one.

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    Vidyut's Avatar
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    I just remembered that 2 drosera curviscapa and capensis are also flowering
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

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    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    It sounds like you are well on your way to achieving your goal. 'Lots of goodies in your collection. We don't see many growing D. curviscapa here and I have always thought it was an interesting species.
    Last edited by bluemax; 02-03-2018 at 02:28 PM.
    - Mark

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    nimbulan's Avatar
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    D. curviscapa is currently considered a synonym of D. aliciae, though in the past D. esterhuyseniae (which is pretty much impossible to find in cultivation these days) was mistakenly lumped in with D. curviscapa as well.

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    Vidyut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nimbulan View Post
    D. curviscapa is currently considered a synonym of D. aliciae, though in the past D. esterhuyseniae (which is pretty much impossible to find in cultivation these days) was mistakenly lumped in with D. curviscapa as well.
    Yes, I realized that too after reading around, but since I got them as curviscapa, I figured I'd call them curviscapa. They seem to not mind growing pretty crowded (I neglected to separate them out as their size grew - kept putting it off because of lack of space) unlike photos I've seen on the internet, where they mostly grow one to a pot. There were some 9 plants in a 2 inch pot. I took out three. There are still some six in there (not counting any plantlets) so crowded that some of their leaves are growing almost vertical and three of them are flowering anyway.

    I figured that I'd wait till I had some seed before repotting in case I messed it up.
    Balcony farmer, carnivorous plants, DIY, sustainability, socio-political commentary India.

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    nimbulan's Avatar
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    Yeah sundews are often sold in big clumps like that due to TC propagation or just scattering seeds around. They don't really mind being crowded but you can separate them if you don't like the look.

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