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Thread: Just got a Sarracenia, but I don't know how to give it a winter dormancy.

  1. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    Wild plants in proper health certainly don't get dappled light; the shorter species maybe more so but they tend to grow in either the most open parts of a bog or where the bog gets more regular burns or clearing. Full sun is necessary for proper health of a Sarracenia, or where that is not possible then long days under very strong artificial lighting.
    The site I found wild Sarracenia purpurea at had them growing in a sphagnum bog that was adjacent to a trail. However, the trail soil was less acidic and hypoxic, so it also supported shrubs and some large trees a little farther away that certainly shaded the area. None of the largest individuals grew there, and all the individuals growing there were completely green, but they were definitely multi-year-old plants that were of a respectable size, and continual germinations were clearly happening based on the number of small plants. I wouldn't suggest it for cultivation, but I don't think those plants saw too many hours of full sun. The bog itself was rather small, so it was also shaded part of the day by surrounding trees (I only found one really red individual). To be clear, I think this kind of habitat is atypical, but I think these plants may be able to tolerate more varied conditions than is often suggested. They probably also had the advantage of growing in Rhode Island, where I think there is less competition than in the deep south, which is perhaps a more typical area for Sarracenia.
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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    lizaryker: the strongest lights you can afford, really. LED are good because they're bright and energy-efficient, not particularly hot, or the T5 Sunblasters, but I also use T8 shoplights.

    schmiggle: You're right, the plants growing in the shade is not typical of Sarracenia growth anywhere. They may survive there, but possibly not for much longer (it's possible the larger plants germinated long before the bushes and trees etc. encroached, and said bushes and trees would be cut back by fire while the Sarrs would survive), and only plants in full sun will likely last long-term. New plants germinating also likely don't survive at high rates in shade. A more typical Sarracenia habitat, at least for the more northern reaches, are the quaking bogs or fens where trees and bushes can't gain a foothold, and you'll find the Sarracenia flourish there far more readily. Competition isn't really a factor outside the being shaded by non-carnivores part which is the same issue everywhere that isn't allowed to burn; other carnivores don't really compete much as Drosera capture different prey from Sarracenia, and the tall Sarracenia do not compete for prey with short species.
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    Oh, I bet it's the burning that does it. This was a pitch-pine forest, so I'm sure the understory would at least naturally burn every so often.
    The worst thing [about being an adult] is when you realize that oreos are just OK
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    Hi. I just came from a tour at the Tannersville bog (a quacking bog) where there were numerous purps growing. Most of them were shaded by bushes, shrubs and trees. The Alder trees shading the bog were hundreds of years old.
    While the purps that were in the shade were green, the few not shaded were a more chrimson color.
    I was actually surprised to see so many large clumps of purps growing in shaded and dappled conditions.
    I will post a trip summary and photos once I get back to my computer.

    Sent from my LG-H815 using Tapatalk

  5. #13
    Gardening freak! tommyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lizaryker View Post
    Hi all. I went to a terrarium event and got three new plants (which I now have to transplant again since she didn't give me the correct information and I'm too new at this to have known) and one of them was a Sarracenia. I asked her for the species name and she said it was Sarracenia Judith Hindle, but I looked it up online and the pictures look nothing like my plant. Someone on this forum said it might actually be Sarracenia Purpurea. Pics are here if you'd like to look yourself. Right now it's in with other plants that it shouldn't be with, and I plan to separate them into their own pots. My question is how do I give the Sarracenia a winter dormancy? I tried searching for this question but maybe I used the wrong search terms because I didn't find it. I hadn't planned on keeping a plant that needed a dormancy but now that I have one I want to make sure it lives happily and thrives. Any suggestions are welcome, and I appreciate all your help. Thanks!
    For me, in N.Y., once night temps get and stay 35-40 F. I remove my Sarrs from the pots, dunk and clean the roots in rainwater. Put them in zip lock bags, spray a little sulphur based fungicide on them and put into the bottom of my fridge. Works great. Like this guy:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHoC...I41wRe5SgRpIcQ

    EXCEPT for purpurea, I leave them in their pots.
    Last edited by tommyr; 10-17-2017 at 06:11 AM.
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