User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  1
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 15 of 15

Thread: A nice surprise

  1. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    It's not something that will ever be heritable; just like the occasional split or double leaf and trap leaves replacing flower parts, it's a random somatic mutation, not a genetic anomaly. You certainly could try to just pop off the one bud and try to make it sprout, but your chances of success would be very low (not enough plant material, the bud would probably just die) and it would be more beneficial to either cut the whole stalk or get seeds.
    Also, from what I can see in the photos, your plant is D. tracyi, not filiformis.
    Ok, thanks for the info, that makes sense. I figured a seed pod would probably be too small anyway.
    What makes you say this is D tracyi? It doesn't particularly matter to me, other than winter care, but I believe the clone is supposed to come from North Carolina, and I thought tracyi only grows in Florida. Maybe it was mislabeled or a mistake
    Edit: Drosera tracyi is a gulf coast endemic, so not just florida, but definitely not North Carolina either.
    Last edited by schmiggle; 08-12-2017 at 06:28 AM.
    The worst thing [about being an adult] is when you realize that oreos are just OK
    --Zach Weinersmith

  2. #10
    hcarlton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greeley, CO, USA
    Posts
    3,553
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In the second photo I see leaves that are drooping to the sides instead of standing upright, bearing extremely dense, very pale tentacles and the flower is a lighter pink than I would expect from filiformis. Also, if the leaves are exceeding 1-1.5' in length that further strengthens the likelihood of it being D. tracyi. The species does not only grow in Florida, but it is a Gulf plant, not found on the Atlantic seaboard so it had to be mislabeled.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  3. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That point about droopy leaves with dense pale tentacles is interesting. I will note that those leaves are old and trying to track the sun--because of seasonal change, I have had to move the plant back so it would still get enough full sun, but these leaves finished growing before I did so. New leaves have the characteristic red tentacles and are growing straighter. Does this still match with tracyi?
    Leaves are probably 10" long, perhaps a bit longer.
    The worst thing [about being an adult] is when you realize that oreos are just OK
    --Zach Weinersmith

  4. #12
    nimbulan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,351
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Filiformis generally has longer and sparser tentacles, while the tentacles on the leaf margins are especially long and reflex toward the underside of the leaf. Tracyi tentacles are more uniform in length, shorter, much denser, and exhibit very little color.

    Filiformis:


    Tracyi:

  5. #13
    hcarlton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greeley, CO, USA
    Posts
    3,553
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nimbulan's photos are a good representation. If the new leaves are getting redder and straighter, it might be a sign of filiformis but even the plants I have that are a bit on the shady side (aka the ones indoors) still stay more or less upright and with long tentacles. If the plant retains traits of both however it may be D. x californica, the hybrid between the two species.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  6. #14

    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I suspect it's D. x californica, then. The leaves are completely green--they never develop a red tint. The leaves remain upright unless they track the light heavily enough that they fall over. The tentacles seem like they're in between in length, and are not particularly crowded. They're very red-tipped as long as they're in bright light.
    Here's a picture of a new leaf:

    Apologies that it's rotated sideways. Does my suggestion sound about right?
    The worst thing [about being an adult] is when you realize that oreos are just OK
    --Zach Weinersmith

  7. #15
    hcarlton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Greeley, CO, USA
    Posts
    3,553
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd still leave it in full sun for a while before making the call. Some D. tracyi can have pretty red tentacle tips (only the tips though; filiformis and hybrids will have the whole gland color up) in strong light even if white or pinkish is more typical. The tentacle density looks somewhere between tracyi and californica, so it may well be the hybrid.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Here's a nice surprise!
    By mass in forum Conservation Station
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 08-06-2013, 09:22 AM
  2. Nice surprise!
    By mass in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-28-2010, 09:25 AM
  3. A nice surprise
    By Jayson16 in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-11-2010, 09:32 PM
  4. Nice surprise
    By ZAK in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-06-2006, 07:50 AM
  5. Very nice surprise.
    By NepenthesMaster in forum Tropical Pitcher Plants  (Nepenthes)
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-05-2004, 12:01 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •